Warm Blips and Clicks

1st_commercial_Moog_synthesizerDuring the time I was learning to play piano (badly) in my youth, I was witness to the rise of modern electronic music.  In 1968 we purchased Switched on Bach by Wendy Carlos and my love affair with the Moog analog synthesizer and the artists who mastered it began.  That same year, my older brother bought me The Beatles White Album for Christmas, and I also heard Dick Hymen’s first electronic album which included the single “”Topless Dancers of Corfu” – a fun bit of pop that showcased many of the sounds possible from analog synthesizers.  This early combination of adventurous rock, classical, and electronic sounds became the basis for much of progressive rock music, from expert practitioners in bands such as Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Genesis and Yes. The sonic depth of this music, and that of their contemporaries was trans-formative – the sound fused to the analog past, and electronic future where all things might be possible.  The sounds made by those early synths still seems fresh today, and is still incorporated in all kinds of music.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn the mid 70s the all-electronic music of Kraftwerk came to my attention via their first several albums, most notably The Man Machine from 1978. As we entered the 80’s I was primed for a new wave of bands that employed synths to drive pop and goth music of the period.  Of the groups from the era, several, like Kraftwerk, used only synth and vocals in their work.  None were more prolific and successful than the musical genius Vince Clark.  Vince was a founding member of Depeche Mode, Yazoo (Yaz), and Erasure – the latter still writing and recording today.  Of these, Yazoo holds a special place as being a perfect blend of pop, soul, and cold clear electronic music.  Singer Alison Moyet provided the vocal warmth with her powerful, soulful delivery on tracks spanning their two releases Upstairs at Eric’s (1982) and You and Me Both (1983).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAlison’s post Yazoo work is varied.  All of her releases since Yazoo have charted in the UK, as she graces any music that backs her massive powerful voice.  This year she released The Minutes, a welcome return to electronic music and an excellent album in it’s own right.  Her tour led to three dates in the states – we hit the San Francisco stop at the Fillmore auditorium, November 14. The show was wonderful, highlighting the new record and long solo catalog along with a handful of Yazoo tracks. Alison’s voice is undiminished, lending a warmth to all the blips, clicks, and patchwork of traditional synth sounds, still fresh and compelling ear candy after all these years.

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