Category Archives: Industry News

Finn Leads the new Mac Attack!

Fleetwood Mac is one of the most popular and successful bands of the last four decades. Their mega-hit albums Fleetwood Mac (1975), Rumors (1977), their masterpiece, Tusk (1979), and follow-up Mirage (1982) were staples of the FM airwaves in Southern California where I grew up. Each member of the band came with a public persona that seemed real, not something manufactured by the music press, where they appeared frequently. Many of my friends hung their posters, and followed their exploits closely, particularly due to their very personal, confessional lyrics and their appeal as representatives of who we were at that point in the 70’s.

FinnMac Classic Lineup

While the band began life as a British blues act in 1967, numerous personnel changes resulted in a cross-pond partnership of both British and American musicians that together had global appeal. Peter Green, Bob Welch, Danny Kirwan – many guitarists and members rotated in and out of this ever-changing band in the early years. In 1975, desperate to save the band after many drug and alcohol fueled hard times, core members Mick Fleetwood (drums), John McVie (bass) and his wife Christine McVie (keyboards, vocals) recruited Lindsey Buckingham (guitar, vocals) and his then girlfriend Stevie Nicks (vocals) to join the already well-honed trio. There had already been nine Fleetwood Mac albums. The rest as they say is history. Or is it?

FinnMac Lindsay 2014

The Mac continued to release material and tour on and off again with or without Lindsay and Christine though to 2015. We saw them with the entire classic lineup and that I assumed would be the last time.

FinnMac Classic Band 2014

Then several things apparently happened, which led to the sacking of Lindsay Buckingham last week:

  • Lindsay reports that the Mac will record a new album for 2015, and stage a last tour (yeah, right!)
  • Stevie reports that she is reluctant to work on new material, lest it cloud memories of the old, and why do it anyway?
  • Lindsay/Christine report that they recorded many songs, none of them with Stevie.
  • Lindsay / Christine release an album and tour in 2017, just last year!
  • In 2018, in April it is announced that Lindsay has been “sacked” from the group, and the next tour due planned to kick off this year (2018). The reason given – arguments of the set list (the set list, really?!?!)
  • It is joyfully announced by the way that Split Enz / Crowded House / solo genius from down under, Neil Finn will join the band for the new tour, and will be accompanied by Mike Campbell of Tom Petty fame!!!!

For many fans this will erroneously be considered bad news. The Mac without Lindsay, didn’t they try that after Tango in the Night, to disastrous results?

FinnMac Stevie 2014

FinnMac Neil Finn Early ShotYes, and no. Well at least, they did not have the new secret weapon – they did not fill the guitarist/singer role with a star or stars adequate to the task. Enter Neil Finn, who is easily the greatest musician, along with brother Tim, to work in and outside of New Zealand…. basically ever. I would consider them The Beatles of ANZ. Neil’s work is not nearly as well known as the Mac. Neither Split Enz, Crowded House, Finn, nor Neil Finn played to stadiums outside ANZ to my knowledge. Here in the states, the typical venues for anything Neil Finn would fit 2,500-5,000 patrons. No “sheds,” basketball arenas or much less stadiums for the genius from down under. It’s the same story for his brother Tim Finn, the greatest tenor vocalist of the 80’s.

All that will change for Neil with the Mac, as long as the publicity is done right and they get fans to the shows. Here it will likely be the Oracle or SAP arenas, particularly if fans “get it” and the publicity is well handled – that is important. So far, there are good words coming out of the camp, with some expressions of excitement.

FinnMac Neil Finn

But listen people – this should not be hard — Neil Finn is a major songwriter, vocal talent, and in fact an amazing guitarist. If all you know from him is “I Got You,” or “One Step Ahead” with his brother in the Enz, or “Don’t Dream It’s Over” and “Something So Strong” from the debut Crowded House album, you are sadly out of touch with this, one of the world’s greatest songwriting and performing talents – you have some catching up to do! Try Crowded House albums Together Alone(1993) and incredibly, the more recent Intriguer(2010). How about his solo work, Try Whistling This, it is achingly gorgeous. Compare the newer Housesong “Amsterdam” to anything off the new Buckingham/McVie album, as pleasant as it is, and it is a stellar album by the way. But again, check it against new lead man Neil Finn, and hear the difference.

You can easily imagine, if your ears are tuned, Neil will clearly grace anything the band wants to do which covers Buckingham, Green, Welch or any of the talented crew that have joined and left the Mac’s lineup. Reportedly, unshackled by a picky approach to the set list, there will be surprises. Why not go back and do “Hypnotized” along with other early gems? Finn can nail all of them.

FinnMac Christine

Now, add to this that we are not only getting Neil Finn. On top of that we will have Mike Campbell, the long time guitarist from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. Anyone who saw Tom perform, rest his dear soul, knows what an amazing lead player Mike is. Now this is getting exciting, concert fans.

See this lineup – maybe the last you say? No, more likely just another chapter. But, the Mac lives on, above and below the equator, and we are all better for it.

p.s. fans of all things Lindsay, of course he will do a solo tour, so…. peace.

FinnMac Lindsay Roots

Updates to the Black Mirror – Keeping it Safe, Really

It occurred to me after reading my last post on the cautionary tales of Black Mirror, that for those of you who don’t know, there are several key things we can all do to help protect from the scourge of identity theft, social shaming, unwanted surveillance, loss of privacy, etc. Do you know these things?

The only reason I know these things so well, if because of my colleagues #Mark Egan, #LarsRabbe, (thanks guys), Mad Security, the genius inventors of @Splunk, and a host of other folks who, during my continuing career in Information Tech, have taught me about the increasing risk of security hacks, and the frankly rather basic things we must all do to protect ourselves.

Hopefully we all know by now why tech is getting so exciting – why we will be able to do things for ourselves that were previously unimaginable, as this all gets so much better, this consumer-driven high tech world we are living in. Hopefully you know about online banking, Fitbit, Juul ecigs, Waze, Uber, Tesla, iRhythm, and that toilet in The Island where Ewan McGregor pees after waking and it tells him “no bacon today.” (Okay on that last one, we must be close to having those, right? I want bacon!)

Want to take advantage of all of this amazing technology without worrying every single second about its disadvantages? Want to watch Black Mirror and not feel sick? Do you already play safely on the Internet, by following the rules, both basic and advanced? Here’s the test…. remember, it starts basic, gets a bit harder:

  • Change your passwords on a regular schedule – quarterly is fine
  • Make your passwords memorable, but do not write them down, do NOT share them with anyone (not at work, home, the spa, or anywhere!)
    Read this: https://lifehacker.com/four-methods-to-create-a-secure-password-youll-actually-1601854240
  • Set a password/screen saver on your Mac/PC/Table/Phone – time out those devices
  • Encrypt your Mac or PC – its easy with the ones that come with your Mac or PC. Get an antivirus package.
  • At work if your IT department did not yet implement Okta (or equivalent) and some small bit of MDM (doesn’t matter who) – give ‘em hell (I know I’m a CIO – so just do it nicely). Okta, makes it so that when you are in the office, you log into all your company’s applications with one regular, strong password. But if you are logging in from home or a coffee shop, you get to use that SAME single password, BUT Okta will text a code to your phone so you can prove who you are. That’s called “Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA)” Also, MDM means “Mobile Device Management” – which means if you lose your phone or tablet, your IT group can wipe it clean so no thieves get your company and your personal data. You can also enable this for yourself, but good to have an IT team behind you as well. Don’t store files from work on your phone, tablet, etc. anyway.
  • Use Dropbox or Box or Google or MSFT for your files – your goal young Padawan, is to store NOTHING in file format on your “Black Mirror” – everything in the cloud, backed up and protected is the way.
  • Let’s punch that last point, fundamentally, work it out on your phone, Mac, or PC so that you store almost NOTHING natively on the device. What Doug? Yes, stream your music, your photos, your videos from cloud services, store youyr files in Box, Dropbox, Google, MSFT – if you have NOTHING natively on your phone, and you lose it, buy/lease another phone, you should be up and running within 15 minutes. That’s your goal friends.
  • Do NOT open emails from people you don’t know – in particular do NOT click on any link they send you. This counts at Facebook, and other social media sites. Doing this by mistake will quite possibly infect you with an “advanced persistent threat (APT)” – these are small programs, given you by bad actors on the internet (again no clicking on links you don’t know) and they insinuate themselves into your company’s systems, onto your laptops, etc. The kind of things they can then do are things like “send all your files, customer records, anything else out of your “network” over to wherever-the-f__-they are, so they can rip us off. Heard of Target, Equifax, other disasters of security? That’s how they do it – and 90% of the time it’s our fault, the employees, who thought it would be fun to click on Uncle Fester’s Daily Joke email.
  • Stream your music from the cloud (Spotify, Apple, whatever)
  • Store your pictures in the cloud (Photo, Lighthouse, Instagram, whatever)
  • Put your movies on YouTube – set up sharing preferences so you can count on that as your portal
  • Don’t invite the world to be your Facebook friends – make it your real friends/family – if you find yourself inviting hundreds of people, make pages for whatever hobbies are compelling you to do so (for instance, my rock n roll book, has it’s own page
    https://www.facebook.com/rockinthecityofangels/
    And a website for my blogs: https://diegospadeproductions.com
  • Use twitter for bullshit – that’s what it’s for https://twitter.com/RockinCOA
  • Stop all paper statements from coming to you in the mail. Shred anything with your personal/banking or other data on it. If you do get paper, Office Max will shred in bulk over at Iron Mountain – the best.
  • Go through your filing cabinet, remove all old paperwork that’s available online, old statements, all that crap you are keeping – I took 39 lbs of paper to Office Max for shredding the first time I got it thru my head that keeping this stuff was dangerous
  • Have your bills, other “payables” pay automatically off your American Express card. Amex (sorry pretenders elsewhere) has the best security protocols, and best customer service. Have the “card” text you every time it is used. You will get a lot of texts (if you spend like me) but they will bring you inner peace as you see bills paid, and know no one is using your card but you.
  • Pay your Amex card once a month. All of it. Carry no interest on bank cards.
  • Use a service to check your credit score frequently. Close all credit accounts you aren’t using and some that you ARE using. Keep enough of a combined credit line to get out of trouble if a spending emergency comes (like, LCD Soundsystem is coming in concert –need to get 4 tickets!!!!). Remember, old cards, unclosed old accounts, and open accounts with high spending limits all add to your “potential liability” in your credit score – clean it up – I like Credit Karma for managing all this.
  • Freeze your credit bureaus – I’m told that if you freeze your accounts at the three main agencies (TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian) you can help prevent people from opening accounts in your name.
  • Take old computers, tablets, phones, etc. to a reputable company – we have one here on Haight Street, who will wipe it – erase your data, private records, everything, and donate to schools.

How many did you get right?

Sounds complicated but none of the above actually IS complicated – that’s the dirty secret of IT (heh heh).

Some people say to me, Doug, why cloud (basically servers at data centers tht are run by professionals – that’s cloud), why store everything elsewhere, not on the notebook I keep in my grubby hands? Well young panther, because they have 10 security guys whose kung fu is better than your one guy’s kung fu. Get Splunk and ask your IT guys to examine how much b__sh__ unknown traffic is coming in and out of your network. Conversely, hook Splunk up to Box, or Amazon EC2, or Salesforce, or Netsuite, go the the beach, and have a Mai Ti while Splunk shows you that no dirty players are logging into your systems, reading or copying your files, etc. We can and do beat these bad actors – don’t let them ruin your digitally-native life.

 

Type Safely, Enjoy the Fruits of Tech…

Doug

Andreas Vollenweider

Andreas Vollenweider is the Swiss genius who gently plucks the electroacoustic harp with such feeling and with such beautiful tones, that he manages in just a few bars to conjure up everything good about the genre of music known as New Age. Next to brilliant keys composer Kit Watkins, he ranks top of the class in this, his chosen art.

Andreas hasn’t been to the states for a very long time, much less, in his native Europe as he’s long been working on new material, for which we are waiting with great expectations. Let’s hope he returns soon.

My wife Artina and I have been “on a tear” over the last decade catching bands and individual musicians in concert wherever the appear – locally in San Francisco or Los Angeles if possible, but if the closest a favorite band plays happens to be on the east coast, New York, Boston, Philly, etc. we will make the trip.  We’ve done this for U2 (360 tour), Billy Crystal (one-man show), The Cure, PFM, and many others. We were fortunate over the last three years to have multiple reasons to go to the U.K. — home of my heart as it comes to music. We saw Simple Minds do their early album cuts at the Roundhouse, Kate Bush at the Odean for one of here 22 rare comeback performances, Stone Roses in the park, and, importantly my hero Rick Wakeman performing his masterwork Six Wives at the castle of Henry VIII, and his Arthurian Legend Redux at the O2. We even saw Artina’s favorite-ever singer/saxman Van Morrison in Lugano – what a blessing. It’s been expensive, certainly a luxury, and I owe it all to my last job at Splunk. I think we’ve “done it all” so to say – not sure as we peruse the list of bands we’ve loved, that another would draw us over the pond again.

Having said that (never say never – a lesson well learned from Sean Connery) I was looking through my hundreds of concert DVDs – yes I’m THAT guy) and slipped in the concert film of Andreas this morning. It’s brilliant, heartfelt, beautiful, as with all of his work. Then I checked his website, and it appears that, at least as of September last year, he plans a new release and tour. If he does that and does not come to the states, we will travel once again. If it is to be in Switzerland, which would not raise a complaint from this fan, then maybe an evening in Interlaken, Zermatt, or Lugano? Please Mr. Vollenweider!

The other main things to report, after I took quite a break from writing:

  1. LCD Soundsystem, the brilliant, Talking-Heads-ish electro-indie band, sold three nights at the Greek Berkeley – gotta go
  2. Steven Wilson is back at the Fillmore in May – his concerts are second-to-none
  3. Bananarama plays in February, as does Robert Plant – certainly two ends of the musical spectrum!?!?
  4. Best yet, the Dixie Dregs have reunited the original lineup, and are playing all over California in April – more on that to come
  5. Anything else I missed?

Dear John

John Wetton just passed away. Many fans have known that this brave and talented artist had been fighting cancer, going through successive treatments that did not lead to recovery. I didn’t know John, only met him twice, but I love his work and have great respect and admiration for his life and journey. The verses and choruses of his greatest music have been running through my head this morning since waking to read the sad announcement. He was and will be remembered as one of the most important and prolific rock artists of our time.

Just want to say a few things, without a deep encyclopedic review of the man and his work. While John lent his time to several projects early in his career, the first really impactful music I heard from the man was from his work with King Crimson. Back when we used to accost our friends to exclaim, “listen to this record!” one of mine handed me two LP’s – wettonjohn2017_crimson_lark_72dpiCrimson’s Lark’s Tongues in Aspic (1973) and Starless And Bible Black (1974). I found this music cast a kind of strange spell while at the same time being aurally shocking, challenging beyond belief, utterly lacking in the kind of sound that would attract anyone but serious musicians. It captivated me and made me a lifelong fan of those who contributed. These two albums capture almost everything that made John such a compelling songwriter, player and vocalist. To be sure, his work on that thunderous monster bass was often stunning – take “The Talking Drum,” a relentless dissonant instrumental driven by Bill Bruford’s tuned toms and John’s four-string attack. The momentous sound of his bass could and sometimes did overwhelm the mix in concert. Full stop… one great bass player.

But what always stuck with me, and kept me collecting John’s work through the next 40 years was his truly golden expressive voice. There was a majestic power to that voice, an incredible sustain and phrasing that alternated between sarcastic and sublime, often with a touch of vibrato but more frequently long clear pitch-perfect tones. This was a voice tailor made for progressive rock, particularly on those songs that seemed to come from an earlier time, that pre-industrial acoustic-meets-electric modern renaissance. Take his gorgeous vocal on “Book of Saturdays” and lines such as “Every time I try to leave you, You laugh just the same.” Or, something more intense and biting from “Easy Money” “Getting fat on your lucky star… Making easy money.” John had an uncanny ability to deliver what dynamic prog music demanded, a lead vocal that could easily flex between gentle and more violent passages. Right from the start, that voice had everything in its arsenal -a yearning that brought the blues, a bite, a howl for justice, a plea for sanity, or just a call to celebrate.

wettonjohn2017_uknancover_72dpiAfter Crimson’s untimely disbandment in 1974, John cast about a bit, eventually forming U.K. with prog luminaries, a band that racked up just two albums followed by a live one taken from the tour I saw, their sophomore outing supporting Danger Money when they opened for Jethro Tull in 1979 as a three piece. This legendary band, though short-lived, tops my list for great Wetton compositions played with maximum dynamics by virtuoso musicians Eddie Jobson, Bill Bruford, Allan Holdsworth and Terry Bozzio. To a great extent, while similar to Crimson in dynamics, this work finds John in his best voice, alternating between near ballads like “Renevous 6:02” and “Ceasar’s Palace Blues.”

When this outfit also broke up, John released his first solo album, which made clear that he was well capable of writing music that was easier on the ears, more major tones, a bit less minor. With this under his belt, John went on to form “super group” Asia where he found the commercial success that had eluded his more musically challenging work of the 70s. With the debut Asia album John finally made a more accessible form of pop music that also captured a wider audience. The concert in support of the album was unforgettable, a master class in prog and pop that I will never forget. I’ve seen him live in concert numerous times over the years, and never saw a lazy or subpar performance, even when he had a cold or off night.

John left behind a large catalog of solo work, and collaborations with so many peers, including most notably keyboard player Geoff Downes and guitarist Phil Manzanera. These albums explore every facet of the rock art – some jazz-infused, some progressive, most really essential rock music with some pop to balance it all out. He worked tirelessly, releasing numerous albums, touring frequently. Sure there were some bumps in the road, but there is so much treasure in the man’s large catalog of music that it will stand the test of time as a major contribution to the form.

wettonjohn2017_arkangelcover_72dpiMy favorite moment of John’s is on his 1998 solo album Arkangel. It reportedly came at a time of personal challenges for this artist, and it’s hard not to consider the title track and some of the content overall as autobiographical. Opening with a crack of thunder, this powerful tome includes fitting lyrics for the fighter:

You are my arkangel, my heart and my right hand
When in the face of danger we stand

The danger is over, the artist now quieted, rest in peace John Wetton, safe journey.

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Because John is featured in my book for his work with both U.K. and King Crimson, I searched for months for photos of the man, and fortunately discovered Lisa Tanner, one of the great photographers of the era, who captured this really beautiful shot of John and his frets…thank you Lisa!

Rockin’ the City of Angels: What?

Click here to buy Rockin’ the City of Angels, the new book now available at Amazon.com

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Titled Rockin’ the City of Angels, the book was a 2 year labor of love for this long time rock fanatic. I described it on the back cover in this way:

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STROBE FLASHES PIERCE THE DARK STAGE to reveal a NYC street punk as he faces the other half of his fractured self. A father’s WWII fighter plane crashes into a wall, temporarily slowing its ascent around his son’s troubled heart. A fiend clad in a white tuxedo steps out from the frame of a graveyard scene onto a haunted stage welcoming all to his many nightmares. A woman, weapon drawn, tells the story of James and his very cold gun. The top drummer from the top 70s rock band in the world pounds out the opening beat that tells us it’s been a long time since he rock ‘n’ rolled . . . a long lonely, lonely, lonely, lonely lonely time.

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David Bowie photo (c) Neil Zlowzower / Atlas Icons

THESE IMAGES ARE SEARED into my memory from the rock concerts I witnessed in Los Angeles, the “City of Angels” in the 1970s, a time when rock bands were making expansive concept records with sweeping themes. Rock albums at the time promised “theater of the mind,” and their creators were inspired to mount elaborate stage shows that brought these dreams to life. These artists used every available piece of stagecraft—lights, projections, backdrops, props, and costumes—to create awesome spectacles for arenas packed with adoring fans— fans like you and me.

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This book celebrates more than thirty of these incredible performances including key tours by bands such as Led Zeppelin, Queen, David Bowie, Fleetwood Mac, Genesis, Heart, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, The Who and Yes. We’ll share memories of those legendary concerts and my reviews of the best video documents of the era, each band illuminated by a hand-picked collection of brilliant images—some never-before seen—by the best photo- journalists of that time including Richard E. Aaron, Jorgen Angel, Fin Costello, Armando Gallo, Neal Preston, Jim Summaria, Lisa Tanner and Neil Zlowzower along with many others.

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Who photo (c) Neal Preston

This coffee-table book is nearly the size of an LP album cover, 396 pages, over 500 images, written by Douglas Harr, designed by Tilman Reitzle. Forword by Armando Gallo.

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The bands, order by category, then the date of their key performance in L.A.

THE BOOK – Rockin’ the City of Angels

Rockin’ the City of Angels, available at Amazon here:

https://www.amazon.com/Rockin-City-Angels-Douglas-Harr/dp/0997771100/

For the two years ending January 2017, I was working on a book with the title of Rockin’ The City of Angels. It’s an account of my experience in the clubs, concert halls, arenas and stadiums in and around Los Angeles, bearing witness to the greatest rock concerts of our time. I illuminate those shows, the album that spawned them, and the best film of the band from that tour or near it. A few reviews from some of the rockers included in the book:

“This book brings to life some of rock’s most creatively magical times”
-Nancy Wilson/Heart

“Rockin’ The City Of Angels” so perfectly captures time and place that I can almost feel the satin pants against my skin as I try to navigate three-inch platform shoes.  The myriad of photos and descriptions of these concerts remind us all of the joy that we shared as rock bands and fans came together to celebrate the thrill of live music. Great job Doug. Now, will you send someone to my house to lift it?
-Dennis DeYoung/Styx

I must say that when I first laid eyes on ROCKIN’ THE CITY OF ANGELS I was struck by the sheer beauty of the packaging and the artwork contained within the pages. I commenced to read the book top to bottom, fantastic! If only I had felt that way about my schoolwork!
-Burleigh Drummond/Ambrosia

Wow, what an extraordinary and absolutely beautiful book! Love the extensive artwork, photos and in-depth text that just pop off of the sleek black pages, nice touch! Mostly tho’, I am extremely humbled and honored to be included in this book with my old Arista Records prog band Happy the Man! Being acknowledged by the wonderful Mr. Douglas Harr in this book is the greatest gift he could’ve ever given me/us. We weren’t anywhere near as popular as most of the acts in this book and were a bit of an “acquired taste”, so to be included with such HUGE acts is indeed a blessing and quite mind-blowing! Thank you for your attention to detail, your time, your passion, your blood, sweat and tears and your commitment to sharing great music! The photos alone are worth the price of admission! Absolutely stunning!!!
-Stanley Whitaker/Happy The Man

It looks like a box set. Instead it’s a Book. And what a Book! It’s one of the best that I have held in my hands. Heavy, good paper, great printing of amazing photos of the best performing band and rock musicians of the early ’70s: Zep, Who, ELP, Queen, Genesis, Elton, Cat, Gabriel, Crimson…

The author, Douglas Harr, defines himself a “patron” of rock concerts. In his youth he paid for over 400 shows in the Los Angeles area. A great fan. Now he is sharing those historic moments of the ‘70s with the help of the photographers who shot them. And I feel honored that I am one of them.

This lavish Book looks good in your home. Any day, anytime of the year! In any room and in any collection. It’s a must. Those were the best years of our life. And you will fall in love with that music all over again. Or for the very first time, as you will discover that Douglas has produced a real labor of love. Get it!
-Armando Gallo/Photographer/Maestro!

It is available at Amazon here:

https://www.amazon.com/Rockin-City-Angels-Douglas-Harr/dp/0997771100/

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The Pitch: At the dawn of the 70s, massive music festivals were born – Monterey, Woodstock, and others launched a decade that would feature some of the greatest musical performances of all time on rock ‘n roll stages. All across the world, rock bands had to take their shows to the next level – lighting, stagecraft, props, films, everything writ large for huge venues packed with adoring fans. The hippie oriented rock of the 60s gave way to epic concept albums packed with fantasy, fiction, and drama, the shows became mega-entertainment experiences. I saw these phenomenal shows in my home town of Los Angeles, at clubs like The Roxy, arenas like The Forum and larger sports venues such as Anaheim Stadium. The bands that excelled offered up entertainers, flamboyant stage antics, rock God presence, virtuosity, or theatrical spectacles combining rock, orchestra, ballet, opera and choir…. Their records promised “theater of the mind” while the shows brought these dreams to life….

This book will raise the curtain on these classic performances with exciting pictures from some of the top photographers of the rock era to visually tell the story of these seminal bands, as I reflect on the music, art and performance that made them into legends. The most revealing films of these and other concerts will be reviewed for each artist.

Remembering Glenn Frey

Eagles_HCFrey_72dpiWhen I was a teenager in the 1970s, you couldn’t turn on the radio without hearing an Eagles song. They were practitioners of the “Southern California sound,” a mix of folk, country, bluegrass and rock played at a typically “mellow” pace (dude), made popular by artists like Jackson Browne and Linda Ronstadt. Like the Beatles, CSN, and Chicago they always had multiple songwriters and at least three strong lead singers who could also combine to create amazing harmonies. The Eagles lyrics always struck a chord; somehow they seemed so much older and world weary than us fans. Songs like “Desperado,” Tequila Sunrise,” “Lyin’ Eyes” poetically exposed the human condition in the way of great country records. “Take it Easy” admonished us to not let the sound of our own wheels drive us crazy, to “lighten up” while we still could. My first girlfriend chose their sweet ballad “Best Of My Love” to represent us, and the song continues to be meaningful to me after all these years. Eventually, the radio overplayed many of these songs, and we “burned out” on a lot of them. In fact, this overexposure kept me from bothering to buy tickets to any of their shows in the 70s. We finally saw the band in Oakland a few years ago during what was their final proper tour, supporting their excellent documentary The History of the Eagles. It was a great show, full of classic songs, guest appearances, and interestingly, interludes where clips from the documentary were played on large screens that flanked the stage.

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Their classic album, Hotel California, the band’s fifth, hit the airwaves in 1976 finding a receptive global audience. Their most polished, accomplished recording, it eventually sold more than 30 million copies. Packed with their signature sound, it’s also a more rocking version of the band, which now included three guitarists, Frey, Don Felder, and new member Joe Walsh. Their excellent musicianship balanced grit and polish making huge hits of the title track, along with “Life in the Fast Lane,” “Victim of Love,” and “New Kid in Town.” The messages in the lyrics are clear cautionary tales of excess, drugs, and lost dreams, mixed in with more typical love songs. The title track was open to interpretation, as was the album jacket’s imagery, which led many to draw outrageous conclusions, Eagles_HC5_72dpiincluding accusations of Satanism. Yet the band was cagy about explaining the meaning, other than saying it was a metaphor for a “journey from innocence to experience.” Of the album as a whole, Don Henley told Rolling Stone “We were all middle-class kids from the Midwest. Hotel California was our interpretation of the high life in Los Angeles.” A stark interpretation it was. The band embarked on a long and successful tour to support the album, which included a stop in Washington D.C. where the proceedings were filmed, and included in that recent documentary DVD.

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A critic had accused the Eagles of loitering on stage, and it’s true that the band exuded the laid back California vibe so perfectly captured in their music. It’s one of the reasons they recruited rocker Joe Walsh into the band just before this album and tour. As the film shows, there were no duck walks, no stagecraft; the most animated player was Walsh whose facial expressions mimicked his winding guitar solos, demonstrated most aptly during his hit “Rocky Mountain Way.” The most memorable moment of the film is the signature solo for the title track “Hotel California” which found Joe Walsh and Don Felder delivering their dueling guitar solo facing each other in an exciting jovial moment. Yet their laconic style does not seem a disadvantage all these years later. It’s a pleasEagles_HC4_72dpiure to watch the band perform their many hits, including down-tempo classics like “Lyin’ Eyes” which demonstrates Frey’s ability to impress the audience, even with his eyes mostly closed! The professionally filmed wide screen movie is crisp and clear, caught by multiple cameras and edited to include wide shots and close-ups that are well timed to maximize the experience. Only eight songs are included, but it’s worth the price of the documentary set to have this content. Hopefully an unedited version of the film will eventually be released in the future.

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We lost Glenn Frey this week, and while it means no more reunion tours for the Eagles, his music will surely live on all over the world. At the time of his 80s solo career success, Frey said he realized, “You don’t have to give this up when you turn 30, 35 or 40. I’ll always make records and write songs. I gotta do them, otherwise I’d go nuts.” He needn’t have worried. Even after the band broke up in 1980 the classic rock format dominated radio stations in the U.S. where the next wave of British punk and dance music was being relegated to niche status. The format continues to this day, and the Eagles are still played frequently all over the world. Frey once said, “even though the band broke up they kept playing our songs all the time. It was like we never went away….we were still on the radio…” And it’s still true. Frey and his body of work will remain in our hearts. R.I.P.