Carl Palmer’s ELP Legacy Plays On!

Once in awhile you see a concert that truly surprises and delights your senses to the core –- one that’s ear and eye candy for the hungry musician inside you. Recently, on March 22, 2018, Carl Palmer’s ELP Legacy played in a small club in Redwood City, California, and this was one of those very amazing occasions.

Palmer Carl Palmer

As most readers will know, Emerson Lake & Palmer was the preeminent “progressive rock super group” that emerged at the beginning of the 1970’s, reigning supreme until a few misfortunes befell the band and they essentially “lost the plot.” Keith Emerson started his career as the keyboard wunderkind of The Nice, growing into a keys juggernaut, favoring multi-tracked equipment of every kind, blended into an aggressively beautiful noise that was frequently overwhelming to anyone remotely familiar with what it takes to play the piano. Greg Lake had already proven his skills as melodious baritone and bassist of King Crimson on their first two massively influential and stunning albums In the Court of the Crimson King(1969), and In the Wake of Poseidon(1970). Carl Palmer, drums and percussion, the only remaining living member of the trio, got his start with none other than Arthur Brown and then Atomic Rooster. The guys banded together in 1970, Greg added guitar to his skill set, and the game was, as they say, on.

ELP_BSS_Cover_72dpiThe group released a series of increasingly complex, multi-layered progressive rock albums, beginning with the self-titled debut in 1970, and continuing with the brilliant follow up Tarkus(1971), then Pictures at an Exhibition(1971), Trilogy(1972), and their undisputed masterpiece, Brain Salad Surgery(1973). Following extensive touring for this 1973 release, which included a stop that was recorded in Long Beach California (Welcome Back My Friends to the Show That Never Ends – Ladies and Gentlemen 1974), followed within days by a headlining spot at California Jam (also featuring Deep Purple headlining an adjacent evening), the band took a long break to rest and recoup.

The last really exceptional work by this amazing trio was then undertaken – Works Volume 1and Works Volume 2(1977) — oddly sold separately and one of four total LP sides devoted to each band member — allowing them to “stretch their wings” (or “ego-up” depending on how one saw the band’s work). As is well publicized, the band then “lost their shirts” mounting a tour to support Works, which featured a symphony orchestra. The massively expensive tour was a ballsy move that cost them a fortune and set the band back on their heels. When they returned in 1978 with an ill conceived follow up, the attempt-to-be-commercial Love Beach, it was time to disband, just as “punk” music had already seen it’s sad and stupid one-year-long stint as the music of the times!

Palmer Carl Band

Though the band reunited, recorded, and toured with new material, there was no way to match the 1970’s era brilliance of what one could argue was the biggest prog rock band of the decade – challenging as they did Yes, Genesis, Gentle Giant, Jethro Tull and Pink Floyd (uh huh, among others) for the top spot. It should be noted that Black Moon(1992) was an exception to the lesser rule, and that album plus tour, which followed, was really the last chance to see the band in good form. In addition, while Palmer managed to stay fit and fluid working with Asia, ELP and others in the years to follow, Emerson and Lake suffered declining heath and physical abilities. Sadly, both passed away in 2016.

——

Carl Palmer has been out now several times with his own band, the ELP Legacy, to give honor to his fallen brethren, to stay fit, in top musical shape, and rightfully remind all of us that he is most certainly one of the world’s top drummers, and now absolutely the greatest drummer remaining from the progressive rock era. Always possessing a muscular ability, coupled with occasional deft gentle touch, always with military snare at the ready, Palmer played a mean kit, backed by dual gongs and well tuned toms. For Brain Salad Surgery, he innovated a synthesized drum kit that, once triggered used sequencer technology to create an electronic orchestra for the drums, as evidenced on the track “Toccata.” It was and is simply an unmatched, violently brilliant work of sonic wonder. (Apologies to Phil Collins, Bill Bruford, Neil Peart, and a few others that vied for the top spot, Carl had or at least has it now!)

Palmer Carl Set ListPalmer plays a great set list of selections from the 70s, and does so instrumentally, with ace guitarist Paul Bielatowicz, and bass/stick player Simon Fitzpatrick. No keyboards you say, blasphemy?  No, Paul and Simon cover all of Keith Emerson’s keys, at least the ones that mattered, unbelievably. These two younger musicians have no idea how good they are – it’s uncanny to watch them just nail this material with aplomb, supported and driven of course by master of ceremonies, the ever talented Palmer. As an example, when they do “Lucky Man” Simon plays bass on the stick with his left hand, while soloing the moog lead with his right at the bottom synthesized end of said stick. Awe-inspiring. Truly. By the time Palmer launches into “Fanfare for the Common Man” within which he slips a 10-minute drum solo, you will be absolutely convinced of your good fortune in catching the man and the living legend, Carl Palmer. I promise, welcome back.

A bit of film, ending with said drum solo!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OQ1NctsKPg

Carl Palmer (drums, percussion, gongs, amazingly great humor and attitude)

http://carlpalmer.com

Paul Bielatowicz (guitars)

https://paulbielatowicz.com/all-about-paul/biography/

Palmer Carl Paul

Simon Fitzpatrick (bass/stick)

https://simonfitzpatrick.net

Palmer Carl Simon

p.s. Only thing that bugged me? Even though many of us in the crowd are getting “up there’ in years, when did we Americans become so lazy?  No one, and I mean no one, stood up between songs to do a standing ovation – it was like they were sitting on their arses, expecting to be entertained. Three of the best musicians I’ve ever seen play live (and believe me, I’ve seen ‘em all) gave a master class on bass, drums, and guitars, and no one can stand up?  Damn. Just sayin’   Over and out.

Palmer Carl Venue

Palmer Carl Venue Pano

Neal Preston IS Exhilarating and Yes, just a bit Exhausted

The new book by Neal Preston, Exhilarated and Exhausted, is finally here, available at Amazon, and it is his masterpiece. At 336 pages from Reel Art Press, favoring rich black & white photography on white or black NP_Neal Preston -Exhilarated and Exhausted coverborder, the book is a stunning collection of Neal’s best work taken from the 1960’s through the present day. While the focus is on the classic rock bands on the 1970’s, a few shots from the 80’s and beyond are included (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pearl Jam, Eddie Van Halen, Michael Jackson, Guns and Roses, and a few others). That means at least 200 shots from this famous photographer laid out among his stories in this highest quality hardbound keepsake.

What is really key about this collection are musings and recollections of Neal himself. There is absolutely no substitute for having the man who crouched into those pits in front of stages around the world tell his story in first person narrative, full of witty and wise anecdotes gleaned from a life on the road, a hard life, but one that in Neal’s case rewarded then and now, as evidenced by this exceptional book.

NP Press 5 Led Zeppelin

I first met Neal over the phone about three years ago. I had purchased a print of his classic black and white shot of Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant between songs on a giant outdoor stage. It’s the one where Robert holds a dove in his right hand, and a beer and cigarette in his left, peaceful smile on his face – you know the one – nearly every kid in high school had a similar (but not Neal’s shot) color printed poster on their wall. We framed it for my wife’s best friend and one of my closest as well. San Francisco Art Exchange passed on my digits, as I wanted to talk to Neal, and was also looking to license some shots for my own book. (by the way a bit of advice he gave me which I regrettably did not use? more B&W shots than color, Doug!)

I will never forget the phone ringing, and Neal on the other end saying something like “yeah, this is Neal, who are you? What is this idea about a book?” He proceeded to regale me honestly and without bluster as to his experiences, cramming in as many stories as he could in what ended up being a 2-hour call with some guy he never met (with numerous protestations that he “had to go, but just one more”). I felt truly lucky, knowing as I did then who Neal was, knowing already about his friendship with Cameron, as I devoured the “extras” on Crowe’s Almost Famous blue-ray release. So yeah, having that kind of time with someone also famous, who shared his passion and introspection without hesitation, was awesome. That’s what this book is, in print, forever.

NP Press 4 Alice Cooper

At the time of our second meeting, Neal was about to stage a gallery exhibit for the lighting design crowd in Las Vegas. He had done a rare show in Germany with several of the same prints on display, and they printed a book of sorts, with many of those photos. But, there was a paltry few paragraphs written by Neal himself. Too few, I told him directly.

Not so here. We learn that Neal and Cameron met at a Humble Pie show in 72. We learn that Cameron hired Neal as the photographer for his first piece in Rolling Stone, about the band Yes (where are those shots!!!). Then we get a master class from Neal about the art, seat and tears that go into being a professional photographer. Neal writes his many stories in melodious voice, drawing us into his circle, sharing asides that make us feel that we are in the pit or in the first row at least, right beside him, seeing through his eyes. I’ve tried to do this – it’s hard – really, really hard to write with that kind of immediacy and even urgency. Neal nails it here.

NP Press 2 Bob Marley

Section titles such as humble musings on being lucky “The Greatest Job in the World,” “The Inner Sanctum,” (It’s a hot zone back there… think Chernobyl with guitars”), “Rock Tour Tension,” and “Bob Dylan Called Me A Leech” frame the stories. Each artist is given a page or more, and maybe some musings, and it’s all very much infectious. For example, when Neal shares his passion for all things Greg Allman, even if you are not a fan, you become one. One of my favorite bits is his advice for aspiring photographers: “I don’t care what kind of pictures you shoot or aspire to shoot…you’re gonna have highs and lows so you have to take the good with the bad.” See, he didn’t have to do that – he did not have to be generous in sharing what he knows and speaking to those of us who relate to what he does. But he does and it works – all of it. As we used to say, “go for it.” My highest recommendation.

 

The Beginning and the Enz of an Era Part III, the End of the Enz

As we learned in part II of this 3 part series, Split Enz was formed by singer/songwriter Tim Finn in 1973, along with Phil Judd (guitars). Tim’s younger brother Neil joined the band for their 1977 album Dizrythmia. While punk was raging in Britain (Sex Pistols) and pop-punk in the states (Ramones), Split Enz was still recording decidedly-not-punk music, while making quiet preparations to draw the world into their loving circle.

Split Enz Vol_III Band Photo

Where we left off, this marvelous act had released a two-fer-of ear candy – True Colors (1981), and Waiata (1981). The two albums that came next will forever go down in the cannon of proggy-new-wave music as absolutely perfect records based every possible measure.

Split Enz Vol_III Time&TideCover_72dpiTime and Tide was recorded in 1981 and released in 1982; the third number 1 album Split Enz brought to ANZ. Tim’s opener to side 1, “Dirty Creatures” (also written by Neil and Nigel) and accompanying video were instant classics for new wavers of the 80’s. “Pioneer/Six Months in a Leaky Boat” grace side 2 and similarly nail every newly minted model in the new wave genre, while being a bit of a sea shanty at the same time! Said to be somewhat autobiographical, the Creatures/Six Months tracks were instant Tim Finn-led classics. In between, Tim’s “Never Ceases to Amaze Me,” and “Small World” cap a brilliant collection from this tenor wonderkind.

The pair of Finn brothers are credited with “Lost for Words,” quite possibly the greatest Enz song on record. Great lyric: “I can’t relate, to your vicious excuses, the damage has all been done, and talking is useless….” Now listen to the bass/drum beats of the verse/chorus and in particular the middle section, while Eddie plays a haunting set of chords that chill, leading back to the verse “I’m looking for words, I give it all I got, And I’m lost for words, you don’t even listen – its’ all been said before so I’ll just turn and walk away.”

Neil is not to be outdone on this classic Enz record. He checks in with “Hello Sandy Allen,” (the world’s tallest woman) and my favorite early Neil track, “Take a Walk.” The lilt of his upbeat guitar, the happy yet seriously dramatic sound of Eddie’s piano thrill as Neil sings:

I could take a walk again
Up a mountain to a stream
Standing on the open rock
Looking out over the sea
Funny when we move ahead
Never worry what we leave behind
Remember what a friend of mine said
You gotta be kind

Truer words…..

Now, before the band composition “Make Sense Of It” which closes the record, the brothers each pen a classic seemingly autobiographical two-fer – Tim’s “Haul Away” (“at 21 I was thirsting for experience and my brain was about to burst”) and Neil’s more haunting, dramatic reading, “Log Cabin Fever:”

It’s cold out hear the wind howl down the chimney
Wish I could just cry out to someone, help
But we live in isolation of the cruelest kind
Scared to show our colours to the world

Time to break away from my condition
Rejoin the human race, see what I’m missing
Try to face the day my private passion
Is eating me away

It’s well worth mentioning at this point that Noel Crombie (drums) and Nigel Griggs (bass) have honed their fine skills to the point that every song is anchored and embellished with their work. Many of the most effective parts they play are based on a kind of aboriginal tribal sound, a compelling combination of tones that will move even the most jaded listener. They teach a master class at the low end.

Split Enz Vol_III Live VHSThat any tour dates from the Time and Tide tour were caught on video is a miracle. It was getting more common by the early 80’s to capture bands on video, but we have many examples to share of groups that have paltry little to show in terms of live in concert documentation.

The live show is taken from an evening in Canada at Hamilton Place in 1982. While to date only available on VHS and YouTube, hopes remain that a proper restoration will come to light for those who never saw the band in their prime.

 

———————

Split Enz Vol_III ConflictingCover_72dpiThe final recording to feature the classic 1980-1983 lineup of Split Enz follows Time and Tide. Marred by a lack of basic PR — hampered by mistakes made by Mushroom Records, they do only a short tour for this record upon its release in 1983. Instead, Tim releases his first solo album, a beautiful work titled Escapade, and the band, essentially, spontaneously dissolves. This time though, Tim’s outside work allow more focus on Neil, who pens 6 of the tracks on this final brothers-together album Conflicting Emotions. Importantly, Neil’s work includes the ode to his newborn son, Liam, called “Our Day.” Considered by this ardent fan as Neil’s greatest lyrical achievement (with unbelievable band backing) the singer /multi-instrumentalist /songwriter pens the greatest cautionary welcome to a child, still in the womb, ever attempted:

Let our love create another life
It’s growing even as we speak
He don’t know what’s waiting for him here
Suspended in his dream sleep
His mother’s all around him
His father’s just a sound to him, singing gently
We have promised him a future
So I’m hoping that tomorrow
Is, was, and will ever be

And we’re waiting now
Waiting for our child to come
The old age is near the end
The new one’s just begun

There’s a face that I will come to love
That I have never seen before
There’s a brain that’s absolutely free
From any kind of conscious thought
You are me, and you are she
It won’t be long ’til we meet
And I’ll be going on a journey
In a flimsy paper boat upon a stormy sea

And so we’re waiting now
Waiting for our child to come
The old age is near the end
The new one’s just begun

Yes we’re waiting now
For something burning far away
Tear the old age down for good
Welcome the young one

I’m shaking like a leaf
Wound up like a spring tonight
You say this ain’t no place for children
Oh God, I hope that what we’ve done is right
Am I vain to feel as if the world
Owes anything at all to me
Searching, burning, tossing and turning
Desperately

And so we’re waiting now
Waiting for our child to come
Can’t imagine what the future holds
Just hoping there is one

Yes we’re waiting now
For something burning far away
Tear the old age down for good
Welcome the young one

Hear this my son, I promise you the best that we can do
We love, we love, we love, we love, we love, we love you…

© Neil Finn / Split Enz

(I hope sincerely that Neil does not mind the reprint here – I do not like to do this, but I talked to Liam about this song, and he shared that it was truly written for him, and it’s just one of the best lyrics written ever, ever, ever, period (peace Neil)).

Neil Finn just nails everything he does on Conflicting Emotions, including opener “Straight Old Line” (also objectively, the best video of the band) “Message To My Girl” (which sent hearts a flutter all over the world), and “No Mischief” followed by “The Devil You Know.” At this point it’s clear — and fortunate, Neil is ready to lead the band, and eventually form his own, Crowded House.

Tim contributes stellar tracks once again, “Working Up An Appetite,” “I Wake Up Every Night” ” (ode to dance lover – this time he do want to dance!), “Conflicting Emotions,” (their most spacey, proggy cut of the band’s catalog and an overt vocal display of vibrotechnics (my word)) and the absolutely gorgeous, heart rending finale “Bon Voyage.” Any listener who by this time does not understand why Tim is one of this earth’s greatest ever tenors, is frankly deaf.

Yes there is some controversy over this album, ignore it, the greatest art we have in this world is marred by controversy, and this is no exception. But, it does mark the point where Tim leaves the band he had started way back in the 70’s, just after Conflicting Emotions, the band’s finest hour.

Photos of the Conflicting Emotions Tour © 1983 Graeme Plenter:
http://www.rockvizion.net/artists/splitenz.html

Split Enz Vol_III See Ya RoundNeil bats “clean up” in 1984 with a collection of songs that were B-sides (“Kia Kaha (Ever Be Strong)”), or were destined for the first Crowded House release (“I Walk Away”). “This Is Massive” is credited to new drummer, and future CH skins maestro Paul Hester. Titled See Ya ‘Round the final album caused more than a few dry eyes to tear up, as it represented the Enz of an era (I can’t help myself). It’s a great album in it’s own right, and while Neil was reportedly uncomfortable going it alone as to Finn family members, it does not show in the results. Tim returned for an “Enz With A Bang” tour, an Australasian outing that once again missed the UK, Europe, and North America – Tim sings his first solo hit, “Fraction Too Much Friction” as part of the long set list and over and out it was. The live album taken from the tour is fantastic.

Split Enz Vol_III Big CanoeAs fair readers will know, to round out the period from 1977-1987, Tim released his second solo album, the masterwork Big Canoe in 1986 and Neil released the first Crowded House album also in 1986. It’s important to state here clearly that Tim’s Big Canoe is a critically overlooked work —  it’s at once accessible, complex, multi-layered music that has to be heard on a proper stereo, hopefully with a small bit of dance floor, waiting near by.

 

The rest is history, including reunions, Tim joining the House for Woodface (1991) and the Finn brothers very special first album together and alone, Finn (1995).

Split Enz Vol_III Band Photo 2

So many of my friends who were drunk on the elixir of “prog rock” did not “get” Split Enz, while I frankly and gladly left them in the dust listening as they did to 80s era Yes/Genesis. What a loss for them! How an album like Time and Tide could only make it to 58 on the U.S. Billboard charts and penultimate album Conflicting Emotions lagging at 137 shows just how clueless we were in the states as to this legendary band. I blame, in part, Mushroom records, and the unfair fate of so many of our greatest artists. Nonetheless these men went on to great success and all is well in our very very small world (it’s not a very big house for a large family!).

Fair readers, this is seriously awesome music you need to hear – again as fresh today as the day it was released. I was privileged to see the band, in the gym of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo – for the Waiata tour — an amazingly fun, artful show that sold me forever on this important, influential band. Check it out, along with Tim’s and Neil’s post 1984 work, along with the rest of the individual band members, who together and apart continued to labor in relative obscurity.

 

The Beginning and the Enz of an Era Part II, the Hard Act To Follow

Split Enz Vol_II Band2My next book will be about the era from 1977-1987 when music changed for the better and new heroes were born. The intro will expose the “glam” and “quirky rock” phase of the 1970’s, which ran from approximately 1972 – 1977. During that time as fair readers will know, we loved the Bowie, the New York Dolls, Roxy Music, T-Rex, and… wait for it…. Split Enz, the Beatles from “down under.”

As we learned in part I, Split Enz was formed by singer/songwriter Tim Finn, in 1973, along with Phil Judd (guitars). Tim’s younger brother Neil, joined the band, for their 1977 album Dizrythmia. While punk is raging in Britain (Sex Pistols) and pop-punk in the states (Ramones), Split Enz was still recording decidedly-not-punk music, while making quiet preparations to draw the world into their loving circle.

The band, now a bit more honed, recorded and released their final album from the formative years, Frenzy (1979). By now, punk has splintered into a dozen branches of far more interesting music, goth, ska, Burundi/jungle/island themed rock, and…”the” new wave. Standout track “I See Red” leads to the Split Enz 1980’s work, refining and honing what it means to be an “art rock” band, sometimes almost “prog rock” yet be danceable, fun, and truly what we came to call the “new wave.”

Split Enz Vol_II True ColorsIndeed 1980’s True Colors was a complete revelation. Less makeup, soon to be none little circus atmosphere, save stage craft and coordinated brightly colored suits (classy yeah!) just serious new wave music designed perfectly to make everyone love the Enz, and love them us smart ones did. Kicking off with their first big hit “I Got You” a Neil Finn composition and lead vocal, an ANZ #1, this was now music to be reckoned with. Add to that, follow up Tim Finn rocker “Shark Attack” and you are talking one fine album! Now take the standout ballad, “I Hope I Never”- if you can really, really listen to those lyrics, and Tim’s yearning, soulful voice singing,…

“I hope I never, I hope I never have to seeeeeeee you again”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMBoDtz1ooY

Split Enz Vol_II Tim Finn

…and not wrest a tear from your eye, you are, as I like to joke to non-criers frequently, “made of stone.” It’s one of the most beautiful songs of the 1980’s and it’s important to note, because by this point keys player Eddie Raynor who graces this one with synth strings and amazing grand piano, is really giving the 70’s proggers a run. Really. Tim kicks off “side 2” with “Nobody Takes Me Seriously” indeed. Neil “fights back” with “Missing Person” sung together with Tim, initially intended to be the first single (really?). Now, spin the next one, and to me the one that shows how ready this band is for stardom.  “Poor Boy” is another Tim Finn gem – take the bass/drum sync of Nigel and Malcolm, expertly pinning down the track on the bottom end, the spacy-synth – “she speaks to me with ultra-high frequency” and Neil’s tightly wound guitar licks…. Gonna listen till I grow old, for sure, yes, please – this music stands the test of time. Those of you who know these songs can follow this chain of thought, this unadulterated affection for the band. The rest of you hit the Spotify, Apple Music, or disks and study up!

Split Enz Vol_II WaiataIt’s tempting to categorize 1981’s Corroboree/Waiata as a sequel to True Colors. Not so. Here is the track list of the most important songs – can you even believe the first “side” of the LP is so perfectly arranged, and “side 2” does not, in any way let up? It may be their most perfect “non proggy” album, refining as it did the definition of new wave music, for the (much much) better.

All songs written by Tim Finn, except where noted. Side one:

  1. “Hard Act to Follow” – 3:17
  2. One Step Ahead” (Neil Finn) – 2:52
  3. I Don’t Wanna Dance” – 3:34
  4. “Iris” (N. Finn) – 2:50
  5. “Wail” (Eddie Rayner) – 2:49
  6. “Clumsy” – 3:29

Side two:

  1. History Never Repeats” (N. Finn) – 3:00
  2. “Walking Through the Ruins” – 4:15
  3. “Ships” (N. Finn) – 3:01
  4. “Ghost Girl” – 4:26
  5. “Albert of India” (Rayner) – 4:03

Just “Hard Act” “One Step” and “I Don’t Wanna Dance” would make a successful album. The third is the most new wave of the new wavers, so danceable, so much vibrato, so much tenor/falsetto – Neil’s guitar, Eddies synth patch, bass/drums all building the story of the boy who is too het to dance, without his sweetheart. On record, this is now one unbelievably great band. Follow up tracks “Iris” “Wail” (not my favorite) “Clumsy” complete side 1. Side two cracks open with “History” then “Walking” later “Ghost Girl” which is better than it has any possible right to be – are you kidding? “Don’t get too close boys to the ghost girl, she’s already haunting you” the clever lyrics seem so easy, so natural for them, both brothers always and to this day make it sound so easy – but just try to turn a simple phrase like that with just the right musical backdrop – art indeed.

So many of my progger friends just did not get this music, while I frankly and gladly left them in the dust listening to 80s era Yes/Genesis. What a loss for them.

Split Enz Vol_II Band

So fair readers, this is seriously awesome music you need to hear – again as fresh today as the day it was released. And, it was the first and only time I was privileged to see the band, in the gym of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo – an amazing fun, artful show that sold me forever on this important, influential band. I remember the band in good spirits, “talking the piss” out of each other, Tim doing push ups, Neil generally appearing a bit more dignified, and all of the musicianship being plainly stellar, with Eddie standing out even live with those amazing ivories. Check it out. Part III soon.

 

The Beginning and the Enz of an Era — The Early Years

SplitEnz_Beginning

My next book Rockin’ Fog City, will be about the era from 1977-1987 when music changed for the better, we danced a lot more, and new heroes were born. The intro will expose the “glam” and “quirky rock” phase of the 1970’s, which ran from approximately 1972 – 1977, leading directly to the decade that followed. During that time as fair readers will know, we loved the Bowie, the New York Dolls, Roxy Music, T-Rex, and… wait for it…. Split Enz, the Beatles from “down under.”

Split Enz was formed by singer/songwriter Tim Finn, in 1973, along with Phil Judd (guitars). They released a couple of albums with Tim and Paul at the helm, The band in costume, makeup and with Tim in front, the voice of an tenor angel, and moves a-quirky, all of which accented the music. Sometimes called “art rock” sometimes alternative, with elements of vaudeville, Split Enz of that early era was a strange brew of “music hall”, “performance art”, and just-plain-fun music, making them maybe the earliest progenitors of what became “new wave” music. As smart music lovers know, in 1977, Tim’s younger brother Neil, joined the band, and history was made.

SplitEnz_MentalNotes_72dpiSplit Enz released their first album Mental Notes in 1975, and Second Thoughts in 1976, Recorded in London, their second effort is the first really listenable Enz album in this writer’s humble opinion. The record included several reworked songs from their debut, and some new bits. Contained in the result is a lot of what made this band great and what also makes anything the Finn brothers have done since, exceptional. Check out “Sweet Dreams” from that album for evidence of their supremacy. Check out the cast members – Ti

SplitEnz_SecodThoughts_172dpim & Phil, joined by Jonathan Chunn (bass), Noel Crombie (percussion), Emlyn Crowther (drums), Robert Fillies (Sax/Trumpet), maestro Edward Rayner (keys) and assorted luminaries. Get this all, who engineered this album… Rhett Davies (Supertramp anyone?), and who produced it… none other than Roxy Music guitarist Phil
Manzanera! The Enz had opened for Roxy Music on their first Australian tour, and had decamped from New Zealand to Australia to build their fan base. Phil was intrigued, and arranged their travel to London to record this gem. Second Thoughts were thunk, and the group’s fortunes grew from there.

SplitEnz_Dispythia_72dpiEnter younger brother Neil Finn in 1977 for follow up Dizrythmia (1977). Anyone ever have “jet lag” will get the title’s reference and applicability to the band’s experience at the time. At first, Neil plays into the vaudeville, circus atmosphere. Phil & Mike are there but abut to be gone from the band, as Neil takes over on guitar, and new permanent member Nigel Griggs on bass. They have the first “bigger” hit, “My Mistake.” While punk is raging in Britain (Sex Pistols) and pop-punk in the states (Ramones), Split Enz was making quiet preparations to draw us into their loving circle.

Check out Tim’s performance of Dizryhmia’s “Charlie” in London
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlnJPVE-gdY

Split Enz V_1 Tim Finn

Fast forward if you must to the 6 minute mark of this video, though who does not have 6 minutes to watch the whole thing? At 6 minutes, Eddie takes center stage musically, features his amazingly beautiful grand piano chops, as Tim sings, “Sunlight, halo, you look wonderful, darling Charlie…, pale and deathly still… for heaven’s sake wake up….Charlie”

Clearly the songwriting partnership of brothers Neil and Tim was kicking into gear, as you notice the touching lyrics, Tim’s delivery, and Neil’s blooming chops on guitar, soon to be co-writer-lead-vocalist as well.

SplitEnz_Frenzy_172dpiFinally, catch the follow up – forth album Frenzy, the first to really push Neil to the fore, with his growing skills on guitar, vocals, and songwriting. Tim wrote most songs, and there are some gems. “I See Red” indeed!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKj4upY1VYI

 

Split Enz V_1 Band Frenzy

But, it’s still a bit of a distance to what was to come next, a honed down version of the band, ready to record 4 absolutely exceptional albums, starting with 1980’s masterpiece True Colors and ending with 1983’s absolute masterwork, and unjustly ignored diamond Conflicting Emotions (1983).

If you are not aware of the pedigree and history of Split Enz, you should be, my friends. But… be warned, while the first four albums, covered here, ending with Frenzy, may excite your eyes (see the videos) it might not be candy for your ears. It’s a tad quirky to say the least, while Tim and the band were finding their way to stardom.

Split Enz V_II NeilFinn_Portrait_cAG_144dpi

 

Updates to the Black Mirror – Keeping it Safe, Really

It occurred to me after reading my last post on the cautionary tales of Black Mirror, that for those of you who don’t know, there are several key things we can all do to help protect from the scourge of identity theft, social shaming, unwanted surveillance, loss of privacy, etc. Do you know these things?

The only reason I know these things so well, if because of my colleagues #Mark Egan, #LarsRabbe, (thanks guys), Mad Security, the genius inventors of @Splunk, and a host of other folks who, during my continuing career in Information Tech, have taught me about the increasing risk of security hacks, and the frankly rather basic things we must all do to protect ourselves.

Hopefully we all know by now why tech is getting so exciting – why we will be able to do things for ourselves that were previously unimaginable, as this all gets so much better, this consumer-driven high tech world we are living in. Hopefully you know about online banking, Fitbit, Juul ecigs, Waze, Uber, Tesla, iRhythm, and that toilet in The Island where Ewan McGregor pees after waking and it tells him “no bacon today.” (Okay on that last one, we must be close to having those, right? I want bacon!)

Want to take advantage of all of this amazing technology without worrying every single second about its disadvantages? Want to watch Black Mirror and not feel sick? Do you already play safely on the Internet, by following the rules, both basic and advanced? Here’s the test…. remember, it starts basic, gets a bit harder:

  • Change your passwords on a regular schedule – quarterly is fine
  • Make your passwords memorable, but do not write them down, do NOT share them with anyone (not at work, home, the spa, or anywhere!)
    Read this: https://lifehacker.com/four-methods-to-create-a-secure-password-youll-actually-1601854240
  • Set a password/screen saver on your Mac/PC/Table/Phone – time out those devices
  • Encrypt your Mac or PC – its easy with the ones that come with your Mac or PC. Get an antivirus package.
  • At work if your IT department did not yet implement Okta (or equivalent) and some small bit of MDM (doesn’t matter who) – give ‘em hell (I know I’m a CIO – so just do it nicely). Okta, makes it so that when you are in the office, you log into all your company’s applications with one regular, strong password. But if you are logging in from home or a coffee shop, you get to use that SAME single password, BUT Okta will text a code to your phone so you can prove who you are. That’s called “Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA)” Also, MDM means “Mobile Device Management” – which means if you lose your phone or tablet, your IT group can wipe it clean so no thieves get your company and your personal data. You can also enable this for yourself, but good to have an IT team behind you as well. Don’t store files from work on your phone, tablet, etc. anyway.
  • Use Dropbox or Box or Google or MSFT for your files – your goal young Padawan, is to store NOTHING in file format on your “Black Mirror” – everything in the cloud, backed up and protected is the way.
  • Let’s punch that last point, fundamentally, work it out on your phone, Mac, or PC so that you store almost NOTHING natively on the device. What Doug? Yes, stream your music, your photos, your videos from cloud services, store youyr files in Box, Dropbox, Google, MSFT – if you have NOTHING natively on your phone, and you lose it, buy/lease another phone, you should be up and running within 15 minutes. That’s your goal friends.
  • Do NOT open emails from people you don’t know – in particular do NOT click on any link they send you. This counts at Facebook, and other social media sites. Doing this by mistake will quite possibly infect you with an “advanced persistent threat (APT)” – these are small programs, given you by bad actors on the internet (again no clicking on links you don’t know) and they insinuate themselves into your company’s systems, onto your laptops, etc. The kind of things they can then do are things like “send all your files, customer records, anything else out of your “network” over to wherever-the-f__-they are, so they can rip us off. Heard of Target, Equifax, other disasters of security? That’s how they do it – and 90% of the time it’s our fault, the employees, who thought it would be fun to click on Uncle Fester’s Daily Joke email.
  • Stream your music from the cloud (Spotify, Apple, whatever)
  • Store your pictures in the cloud (Photo, Lighthouse, Instagram, whatever)
  • Put your movies on YouTube – set up sharing preferences so you can count on that as your portal
  • Don’t invite the world to be your Facebook friends – make it your real friends/family – if you find yourself inviting hundreds of people, make pages for whatever hobbies are compelling you to do so (for instance, my rock n roll book, has it’s own page
    https://www.facebook.com/rockinthecityofangels/
    And a website for my blogs: https://diegospadeproductions.com
  • Use twitter for bullshit – that’s what it’s for https://twitter.com/RockinCOA
  • Stop all paper statements from coming to you in the mail. Shred anything with your personal/banking or other data on it. If you do get paper, Office Max will shred in bulk over at Iron Mountain – the best.
  • Go through your filing cabinet, remove all old paperwork that’s available online, old statements, all that crap you are keeping – I took 39 lbs of paper to Office Max for shredding the first time I got it thru my head that keeping this stuff was dangerous
  • Have your bills, other “payables” pay automatically off your American Express card. Amex (sorry pretenders elsewhere) has the best security protocols, and best customer service. Have the “card” text you every time it is used. You will get a lot of texts (if you spend like me) but they will bring you inner peace as you see bills paid, and know no one is using your card but you.
  • Pay your Amex card once a month. All of it. Carry no interest on bank cards.
  • Use a service to check your credit score frequently. Close all credit accounts you aren’t using and some that you ARE using. Keep enough of a combined credit line to get out of trouble if a spending emergency comes (like, LCD Soundsystem is coming in concert –need to get 4 tickets!!!!). Remember, old cards, unclosed old accounts, and open accounts with high spending limits all add to your “potential liability” in your credit score – clean it up – I like Credit Karma for managing all this.
  • Freeze your credit bureaus – I’m told that if you freeze your accounts at the three main agencies (TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian) you can help prevent people from opening accounts in your name.
  • Take old computers, tablets, phones, etc. to a reputable company – we have one here on Haight Street, who will wipe it – erase your data, private records, everything, and donate to schools.

How many did you get right?

Sounds complicated but none of the above actually IS complicated – that’s the dirty secret of IT (heh heh).

Some people say to me, Doug, why cloud (basically servers at data centers tht are run by professionals – that’s cloud), why store everything elsewhere, not on the notebook I keep in my grubby hands? Well young panther, because they have 10 security guys whose kung fu is better than your one guy’s kung fu. Get Splunk and ask your IT guys to examine how much b__sh__ unknown traffic is coming in and out of your network. Conversely, hook Splunk up to Box, or Amazon EC2, or Salesforce, or Netsuite, go the the beach, and have a Mai Ti while Splunk shows you that no dirty players are logging into your systems, reading or copying your files, etc. We can and do beat these bad actors – don’t let them ruin your digitally-native life.

 

Type Safely, Enjoy the Fruits of Tech…

Doug

Andreas Vollenweider

Andreas Vollenweider is the Swiss genius who gently plucks the electroacoustic harp with such feeling and with such beautiful tones, that he manages in just a few bars to conjure up everything good about the genre of music known as New Age. Next to brilliant keys composer Kit Watkins, he ranks top of the class in this, his chosen art.

Andreas hasn’t been to the states for a very long time, much less, in his native Europe as he’s long been working on new material, for which we are waiting with great expectations. Let’s hope he returns soon.

My wife Artina and I have been “on a tear” over the last decade catching bands and individual musicians in concert wherever the appear – locally in San Francisco or Los Angeles if possible, but if the closest a favorite band plays happens to be on the east coast, New York, Boston, Philly, etc. we will make the trip.  We’ve done this for U2 (360 tour), Billy Crystal (one-man show), The Cure, PFM, and many others. We were fortunate over the last three years to have multiple reasons to go to the U.K. — home of my heart as it comes to music. We saw Simple Minds do their early album cuts at the Roundhouse, Kate Bush at the Odean for one of here 22 rare comeback performances, Stone Roses in the park, and, importantly my hero Rick Wakeman performing his masterwork Six Wives at the castle of Henry VIII, and his Arthurian Legend Redux at the O2. We even saw Artina’s favorite-ever singer/saxman Van Morrison in Lugano – what a blessing. It’s been expensive, certainly a luxury, and I owe it all to my last job at Splunk. I think we’ve “done it all” so to say – not sure as we peruse the list of bands we’ve loved, that another would draw us over the pond again.

Having said that (never say never – a lesson well learned from Sean Connery) I was looking through my hundreds of concert DVDs – yes I’m THAT guy) and slipped in the concert film of Andreas this morning. It’s brilliant, heartfelt, beautiful, as with all of his work. Then I checked his website, and it appears that, at least as of September last year, he plans a new release and tour. If he does that and does not come to the states, we will travel once again. If it is to be in Switzerland, which would not raise a complaint from this fan, then maybe an evening in Interlaken, Zermatt, or Lugano? Please Mr. Vollenweider!

The other main things to report, after I took quite a break from writing:

  1. LCD Soundsystem, the brilliant, Talking-Heads-ish electro-indie band, sold three nights at the Greek Berkeley – gotta go
  2. Steven Wilson is back at the Fillmore in May – his concerts are second-to-none
  3. Bananarama plays in February, as does Robert Plant – certainly two ends of the musical spectrum!?!?
  4. Best yet, the Dixie Dregs have reunited the original lineup, and are playing all over California in April – more on that to come
  5. Anything else I missed?

THE 80s ARE COMING