Tag Archives: alternative

Paula Frazer’s Best Yet – What Is And Was

PaulaFrazer2017_CoverSome artists labor in relative obscurity for good reason –either they are painfully shy, not promoted well, or their work just does not fit the times or the zeitgeist of the day. But there are others who are less known than they should be – sometimes so unknown that it’s somewhat criminal, and neglectful of us to allow such indifference in this interconnected world. Now, let me say, Paula Frazer might not like this characterization, but she is absolutely one of the most talented singer-songwriters in the world – the best of her kind that I’ve ever come across. And my wife does her hair in San Francisco.

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Really, I’ve sat and talked to Paula while her hair is done, and a less assuming person you will never meet. I truly think she believes she is a “average.” Yet, What Is And Was, by Paula Frazer and Tarnation is truly a masterpiece, something that seems otherworldly in it’s perfection. Songs like opener “Between the Lines” and the follow up title track sneak up on you with beguiling simplicity that unfolds into complex mastery. To realize all this, get the LP or download, and read the lyrics, check the instrumentation. This is as good as it gets.

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While Paula writes all the songs, the members of Tarnation also make this record awesome by their work. Jacob Aranda on guitar and vocals, is a key player – he is a tremendous singer-songwriter on his own accord with albums to prove it – ones that are also well worth collecting. Jacob adds electric guitar solos to the acoustic mix that make use of the tremolo arm, much as Chris Isaak before. It’s all Jacob’s own though, and it is all inspired playing. Many additional collaborators join Paula on keys, drums, vocals, pedal steel, and guitar. But as a sign of her prodigy-like status and talent, Paula writes, sings, and plays guitar, wood flute, bass, xylophone, drums, and percussion. Is that an octupple threat?

Lyrics to “Followed You There” reprinted by permission © Paula Frazer:

PaulaFrazer2017_Lyrics

New High Recordings released the album in 2017, but I got my copy from Paula’s garage. She would say, “yeah it’s okay, check it out.” I would say, bring a hanky and some ready ears –it’s unbelievably great music, and my new favorite album.

NHR describes Paula well here:
https://newhighrecordings.com/paula-frazer/

PaulaFrazer2017_RedRecordThe vinyl LP is recommended, and it comes in a red platter that adds to the album’s mystique. You can also download the album from basecamp, naming your own price. Don’t be stingy. She and her band are well worth full price!

On Red Vinyl or download
https://newhighrecs.bandcamp.com/album/what-is-and-was

What Is And Was
Paula Frazer and Tarnation
All songs written by Paula Frazer – Tarnation Music Publishing, BMI
© & (p) 2017 Paula Frazer
NewHighRecordings.com

LCD’s American Dream

Ban=ck in the day, a very very long time ago, we would have called LCD Soundsystem “totally bitchin!” They performed this year both at the Bill Graham auditorium in San Francisco, and just the other night at the Berkeley Greek Theater.  Our night was the second of three sold-out shows, on Saturday April 28. The band delighted the anxiously awaiting crowd, once again taking their place a the top of the electro-funk pantheon, delivering an explosive concert consisting of 16 perfectly chosen tracks. Many of these tracks were played at their “farewell” concert 7 years ago at Madison Square Gardens, chronicled in the exceptional film Shut Up and Play the Hits(2011) and the live album Live at Madison Square Gardens. I cherish that film and as it perfectly captures how astoundingly great this band’s live shows had been. Fortunately at Berkeley they hewed closely to that winning formula, as they did for their “comeback” two summers ago at Golden Gate Park.

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LCD2018_AmericanThe band’s latest album American Dream (2017) was featured via 4 songs, “Call The Police,” “Tonight,” and “Emotional Haircut.” These are fab tracks from the new record which rates highly in their catalog, surprisingly fresh after a rather long career, certainly helped by a long break and time for Murray to D.J. it up a bit in his favorite clubs. Other than the four new ones, the staples were, rightfully so, on full display – beginning with set opener “You Wanted A Hit” and closing with “All My Friends,” a crowd-pleaser if ever there was.

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As to staging, the band stays rather close together, surrounded by all manner of drums, percussion, electronic keyboards, and space for the bassist and drummer with lead man, vocalist, multi-instrumentalist James Murphy up front, and able to wander the small passages between. Crammed in with all that gear, the presentation seemed somehow intimate, despite the number of musicians. Lighting is simple but effective, a giant glitter ball hung top center stage. It was from start to finish, once again, one of the best concerts of the millennia thus far.

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LCD Soundsystem, as described by writer and musician Nick Sylvester is “the sound of a man digging himself out of his own skull… an extremely smart and sensitive man wrestling his inner Klosterman” (by the way, Klosterman is a quirky American author and essayist who writes thoughtfully about American popular culture).This gets at the heart of why these confessional, observational songs speak to so many, songs like “Losing My Edge,” sporting these lyrics:

I’m losing my edge
I was there.
I was the first guy playing Daft Punk to the rock kids.
I played it at CBGB’s.
Everybody thought I was crazy.

On the studio albums, nearly everything you hear is played by Murphy – in concert he has a troupe of musicians, changing at times based on availability. The performance is incredibly tight, each musician playing his or her part with startling accuracy yet requisite live energy. The best of their songs start with a beat, sometimes laid down by a drum machine, but more often by precision-driven drummer Pat Mahoney, sometimes by a keyboard sequence triggered or played by Nancy Whang or Gavin Russom. As the song progresses, additional contrapuntal lines are drawn, the beat is intensified, bass, guitar or treated electronics are added, until the drone or melody comes clear and captivating, and Murphy adds vocals, working his rich baritone. Interlocking riffs are added or taken away to change the dynamics, which ultimately build into ecstatic abandon. This is the main recipe for the band, and it’s done wonders for space rock, afro funk, new wave and alt/indie bands past and present. The most frequent touch point I could think of was the Talking Heads, Remain in Light era work with Brian Eno – or more recently the kind of dynamics mastered by Arcade Fire. Murphy stirs it all up and makes something new and unique. It’s beautiful frenetic dance music that’s utterly irresistible.

LCD_SUAPTH_Cover_72dpiThe aforementioned film, Shut Up and Play the Hits(2011) directed by Dylan Southern and Will Lovelace, is as spectacular a concert movie as any in my collection. The entire three-and-a-half show is captured, along with interviews and a portrait of James Murphy as he prepares for the event, intended to be their last.  The shoot is professional, multiple camera angles fixed and handheld, both close-up and long/wide angles provide viewers with a bird’s eye perspective, illuminating how the large band works together to create the whole.

The movie kicks off with three of their best songs “Dance Yrself Clean,” “Drunk Girls,” and “I Can Change.” At the end of those tracks, at 20 minutes into the film, you’ll know if this is a band for you – don’t be surprised if you’re singing “I Can Change” over and over again for days, such is it’s status as an electro-funk earworm!  At the end of the film, as Murphy croons the slow burner “New York, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down” staring and smiling wistfully at the sell-out crowd while the balloons fall from the rafters, it’s impossible not to feel a bit sentimental, a bit of loss for their disbandment. Fortunately for the music world, Murphy and his collaborators are back. Let’s hope they remain, on record, and in lights.

Video: All My Friends (from Madison Square Gardens)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9wnbPUgq6c

LCD Soundsystem (live band)

James Murphy – vocals, percussion, synthesizer, organ, keyboards, piano, kalimba
Tyler Pope – bass, samples, synthesizer, percussion, organ
Pat Mahoney – drums, synth pads, vocals
Nancy Whang – synthesizer, vocals, piano, organ, samples, Wurlitzer
Gavin Russom – synthesizer, percussion, piano, Wurlitzer, clavinet, vocals, vocoder
Matthew Thornley – guitar, percussion, percussion [electronic percussion], bass, synthesizer, electric piano, samples
Al Doyle – guitar, vocals, percussion, synthesizer, bass, clavinet, trumpet, organ, glockenspiel

And new touring member, Korey Richey – percussion, synths, piano, vocals

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Finn Leads the new Mac Attack!

Fleetwood Mac is one of the most popular and successful bands of the last four decades. Their mega-hit albums Fleetwood Mac (1975), Rumors (1977), their masterpiece, Tusk (1979), and follow-up Mirage (1982) were staples of the FM airwaves in Southern California where I grew up. Each member of the band came with a public persona that seemed real, not something manufactured by the music press, where they appeared frequently. Many of my friends hung their posters, and followed their exploits closely, particularly due to their very personal, confessional lyrics and their appeal as representatives of who we were at that point in the 70’s.

FinnMac Classic Lineup

While the band began life as a British blues act in 1967, numerous personnel changes resulted in a cross-pond partnership of both British and American musicians that together had global appeal. Peter Green, Bob Welch, Danny Kirwan – many guitarists and members rotated in and out of this ever-changing band in the early years. In 1975, desperate to save the band after many drug and alcohol fueled hard times, core members Mick Fleetwood (drums), John McVie (bass) and his wife Christine McVie (keyboards, vocals) recruited Lindsey Buckingham (guitar, vocals) and his then girlfriend Stevie Nicks (vocals) to join the already well-honed trio. There had already been nine Fleetwood Mac albums. The rest as they say is history. Or is it?

FinnMac Lindsay 2014

The Mac continued to release material and tour on and off again with or without Lindsay and Christine though to 2015. We saw them with the entire classic lineup and that I assumed would be the last time.

FinnMac Classic Band 2014

Then several things apparently happened, which led to the sacking of Lindsay Buckingham last week:

  • Lindsay reports that the Mac will record a new album for 2015, and stage a last tour (yeah, right!)
  • Stevie reports that she is reluctant to work on new material, lest it cloud memories of the old, and why do it anyway?
  • Lindsay/Christine report that they recorded many songs, none of them with Stevie.
  • Lindsay / Christine release an album and tour in 2017, just last year!
  • In 2018, in April it is announced that Lindsay has been “sacked” from the group, and the next tour due planned to kick off this year (2018). The reason given – arguments of the set list (the set list, really?!?!)
  • It is joyfully announced by the way that Split Enz / Crowded House / solo genius from down under, Neil Finn will join the band for the new tour, and will be accompanied by Mike Campbell of Tom Petty fame!!!!

For many fans this will erroneously be considered bad news. The Mac without Lindsay, didn’t they try that after Tango in the Night, to disastrous results?

FinnMac Stevie 2014

FinnMac Neil Finn Early ShotYes, and no. Well at least, they did not have the new secret weapon – they did not fill the guitarist/singer role with a star or stars adequate to the task. Enter Neil Finn, who is easily the greatest musician, along with brother Tim, to work in and outside of New Zealand…. basically ever. I would consider them The Beatles of ANZ. Neil’s work is not nearly as well known as the Mac. Neither Split Enz, Crowded House, Finn, nor Neil Finn played to stadiums outside ANZ to my knowledge. Here in the states, the typical venues for anything Neil Finn would fit 2,500-5,000 patrons. No “sheds,” basketball arenas or much less stadiums for the genius from down under. It’s the same story for his brother Tim Finn, the greatest tenor vocalist of the 80’s.

All that will change for Neil with the Mac, as long as the publicity is done right and they get fans to the shows. Here it will likely be the Oracle or SAP arenas, particularly if fans “get it” and the publicity is well handled – that is important. So far, there are good words coming out of the camp, with some expressions of excitement.

FinnMac Neil Finn

But listen people – this should not be hard — Neil Finn is a major songwriter, vocal talent, and in fact an amazing guitarist. If all you know from him is “I Got You,” or “One Step Ahead” with his brother in the Enz, or “Don’t Dream It’s Over” and “Something So Strong” from the debut Crowded House album, you are sadly out of touch with this, one of the world’s greatest songwriting and performing talents – you have some catching up to do! Try Crowded House albums Together Alone(1993) and incredibly, the more recent Intriguer(2010). How about his solo work, Try Whistling This, it is achingly gorgeous. Compare the newer Housesong “Amsterdam” to anything off the new Buckingham/McVie album, as pleasant as it is, and it is a stellar album by the way. But again, check it against new lead man Neil Finn, and hear the difference.

You can easily imagine, if your ears are tuned, Neil will clearly grace anything the band wants to do which covers Buckingham, Green, Welch or any of the talented crew that have joined and left the Mac’s lineup. Reportedly, unshackled by a picky approach to the set list, there will be surprises. Why not go back and do “Hypnotized” along with other early gems? Finn can nail all of them.

FinnMac Christine

Now, add to this that we are not only getting Neil Finn. On top of that we will have Mike Campbell, the long time guitarist from Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. Anyone who saw Tom perform, rest his dear soul, knows what an amazing lead player Mike is. Now this is getting exciting, concert fans.

See this lineup – maybe the last you say? No, more likely just another chapter. But, the Mac lives on, above and below the equator, and we are all better for it.

p.s. fans of all things Lindsay, of course he will do a solo tour, so…. peace.

FinnMac Lindsay Roots

Steven Wilson’s Masonic Moment

Steven Wilson brought what will likely be the final leg of his Hand. Cannot. Erase tour to the Nob Hill Masonic Auditorium San Francisco, Friday November 4, 2016. This is the third time I’ve seen Wilson on this tour – the first being in early 2015 and the second at the Royal Albert Hall in London. While the RAH show held many surprises, the show at the Masonic hewed much closer to the original leg of the tour, with the addition of a recent song off his six-song EP 4 1/2. It was another in a series of amazing concerts concerts which have served well to thrill Wilson’s existing fans and expand his audience.

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To begin the show, Steven and his well-seasoned band again performed the entire album Hand. Cannot. Erase, a concept record that fictionalizes the tragic true story of Joyce Carol Vincent, a young woman found dead in her London apartment, undiscovered and not wilsonsteven2016_cover_72dpimissed by anyone for over two years. On this night Ninet Tayeb (aka Nina) was not present to sing the devastating, beautiful lead vocal on “Routine,” though a recording of her vocal was used in part and the song was still a standout. With the focus appropriately on the five musicians on stage, dramatic subject matter and skilled performances graced the first half of the show.

After an intermission, the band continued with masterful versions of Porcupine Tree songs “Dark Matter,” “Lazarus,” “Harmony Korine” (again an enduring highlight of these shows) and “Sleep Together.” There was also a new track from 4 1/2, “My Book of Regrets,” followed later by “Don’t Hate Me” (originally a Porcupine Tree song from 1999’s Stupid Dream). These sounded equally fresh and powerful, despite another missed opportunity to hear Ninet who is featured in studio on the latter remake. Wilson began the encore of three songs with a Prince cover “Sign of the Times” which he promoted as a better choice than the typical cover of that artist’s rich and varied catalog. So true. Next up, a stellar rendition of Porcupine Tree song “The Sound of Muzak” and closing the show, the gorgeous title track from Wilson’s fantastic album The Raven Who Refused To Sing, a song he described as representing his best work, an agreeable notion for many fans.

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Wilson and his concert production team are adept at staging this work live, setting the mood with long dissonant ambient sounds, muted lighting and surrealistic imagery projected on a stunning high definition screen. As with earlier shows in the tour, the lighting techniques were clever and colorful. Sound was crisp and clear, reproduced by the top-notch audio system, which sounded amazing in the acoustic-friendly Masonic. Even with all the finery, the primary focus remained on the band members demonstrating their virtuosic skills throughout. From the increasingly well-rehearsed touring band there were complex rhythms and solos from lead guitar player Dave Kilminster, electronic textures and brisk synth leads from keyboard player Adam Holzman, and a deep, thunderous bottom end and vocal harmonies from Nick Beggs on basses, paired with skilled drummer Craig Blundell. It was plainly visible that each one of the musicians has become exceedingly adept and delivering this material – in particular Kilminster and Holzman cranked out a number of superb progressive-laden solos throughout the evening.

Wilson delivered his poetic lyrics throughout in fine voice, alternating skillfully between guitar, bass, keys and samples. He displayed his wit and thoughtfulness between tracks as lead raconteur. These elements combined to make up a masterful set; an evening of dramatic, inspirational and at times emotionally overwhelming musical theater. Wilson remains at the top of the list of artists I’ve seen over these now forty years with his accomplished, expressive body of work and ability to so expressively present it all live in concert.

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There are a handful of shows remaining in the U.S. this year, along with two in India, with no other plans announced at this time – get there if you can…nothing lasts forever!

Twitter: @diego_spade
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/diegospadeproductions/

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Mew at The Fillmore

Mew_1Danish alternative rock band Mew, hailing from Copenhagen retuned to San Francisco last week at the Fillmore Auditorium. It was their first time staging a headlining tour in the Americas in 6 years, supporting their new release +- (plus-minus). The venue was packed with an equal share of loyal fans and many newcomers, drawn to the band on the strength of the recent album. They opened the show with powerful new track “Witness” followed by “Satellites” the lead single from +-, a bit of breezy pop featuring shimmering keys, arpeggios on electric guitars, driving backbeat and soaring, ethereal lead vocals by Jonas Bjerre, the clear focal point of this acclaimed band. Sometimes when a group leads off with their top single it demonstrates a confidence in their set list, and this was the case with Mew, as they ran through six new songs, and ten from their prior releases, delivering an assured, magnificent concert.

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Mew actually dates back to 1994, with six albums now in their catalog. The band for this tour includes Jonas Bjerre (vocals, keyboards), John Wohlert (bass, backing vocals), Silas Utke Graae Jorgensen (drums) and touring musicians Mads Wegner (guitars, replacing recently departed member Bo Madsen) and Nick Watts (keyboards). The band play relatively loud, rarely using dynamics to bring the sound down to highlight Bjerre’s amazing voice, in the way that for instance The National has done on their last tour. Also, for this tour, the band put some effort into some unique lighting and original video clips created by Bjerre. Unfortunately on this night at the Fillmore, these were not used, replaced instead by relatively simple back lighting. Nonetheless, these are minor quibbles, as the band was energetic, and in top form, driving their blend of proggy indie rock to stadium level dynamics, best exemplified by rocker “My Complications” from +-. A highlight in the setlist for this patron was the second single from that same album, “Water Slides” which has one of the catchiest choruses in recent memory:

For such a long time I didn’t know if I’d find you
Say stop, made up, lying on the bathroom floor
(ah ah ah ah ah ah ah)

Mew_2This one put me in mind of dreamy 80’s artists Cocteau Twins, and some of their more accessible songs from Heaven Or Las Vegas. In fact, during a recent interview with vocalist Bjerre, he states that his parents listened to a lot of Eurythmics, Kate Bush, and other pop from the ‘80’s but that alterative-rock artists like Nirvana, My Bloody Valentine, Sonic Youth and others stoked the flame and brought them together back in 1994. In addition to these bands, he says “all those ‘80s pop influences, and the sense of storytelling those bands had, kind of sneaked slowly into our sound.” It’s hard to classify Mew, not that it’s necessary, as fans modern rock of any type should check out their fantastic new album and if you can, their current tour.

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The Dodo’s

By the way, The Dodos opened for Mew, delivering a blistering set that featured drummer Logan Kroeber’s unique style of playing. This talented percussionist uses almost no symbols, but plenty of precise, rolling toms, and lots of rim shots. Metric Long accompanies with lead vocals and guitar, favoring a frenetic finger picking style, and rapid-fire leads that are fitting to his name! Will definitely be checking out a headlining show from these creative indie rockers.

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Midlake Live on in Denton

Midlake_DVD_advertMidlake is a band that mixes a bit of folk, psychedelic, and alternative rock into a unique brand of heartfelt indie music. The group has weathered personnel changes and is now at their strongest with guitarist and lead vocalist Eric Pulido joined by Paul Alexander (bass/vocals), Joey McClellan (guitar/vocals), Jesse Chandler (keys/flute/vocals) Eric Nichelson (guitar/keys) and McKenzie Smith (drums). Notice if you will, that’s a lot of guys who can sing, and they make full use of that vocal talent. Led by Eric’s rich baritone their four-part harmonies fill the latest album, Antiphon (2013), infusing normally down-tempo sounds with beautiful warm tones. Structured compositions give way to free flowing instrumental excursions, mixing flute, lightly distorted guitar leads, and strong lyrics, from the lost love of “Aurora Gone” to the prose admonishing us to bear the “Old and the Young:”

Awoke from a long one that came on the heels of a day
Where sun would arise and then grant us the kindness of ray
Fields full of gladness surrounded by droves that await
And look for the grave in everything adorn
Bear the old and the young

Midlake_Antiphon_CoverFans of Wilco, Badly Drawn Boy, Sea Wolf, The National, and other bands of this kind take note – its challenging, soulful music that’s stands a cut above – one of the best records of its kind so far this decade. Best listen to the title track, “Antiphon” to experience the whole. Follow up with the propulsive beat of the melancholic yet hopeful “Old and the Young.”

Midlake – Antiphon – Title Track (Youtube)
Midlake – Antiphon – Old and the Young (Youtube)

At points, the use of flute, Hammond organ, inventive bass leads, and propulsive drumming will put you in mind of classic rock and progressive contemporaries of long ago. Musical influences like Jethro Tull, Fleetwood Mac, and Pink Floyd have been suggested by others, but importantly this music sounds very much of today – an unique combination of these elements and more without being derivative.

Midlake_DVD_Cover_DSHAfter spending some time on the indie film circuit, last month on Record Store day, Midlake released a DVD of a movie by Jason Lee and Eric Noren: Live in Denton, TX. I snagged the last copy at our local Amoeba Records store in San Francisco. The film is a rare document of this band playing in a small club in, you guessed it, Denton, Texas. The footage captures the concert, interspersing close shots of the band during performance with shots of the city of Denton, it’s inhabitants, and workaday life. The career-spanning set list includes many of their best songs – lots of tracks from their earlier albums including Bamnan & Slivercork (2004), The Trials of Van Occupanther (2006), and The Courage of Others (2010) along with six from their newest, which is really a big step forward for the band. The musicianship and vocal delivery is top notch, and the soundtrack reproduces the live set perfectly – lots of deep bass & drums, with shimmering keys, flute, guitars, and Eric’s amazingly strong lead vibrato, backed by those beautiful harmonies.

Midlake_DVD_Eric72DPIThe film’s images are crisp and clear – lots of deeps hues, colored lights, and interesting use of varying points of focus. Due to the small club setting, and possibly also to represent the experience of those in attendance, many shots are captured from positions in the crowd, which obscures a bit of the action, and the club and stage itself is often so darkly lit it can be tough to catch the musicians technique. Still, it’s fitting to the sometimes-brooding compositions and the drama of their songs. Near the end of the set we get a little more light on the band, and might well recognize them when, hopefully, the next tour rolls into town! Don’t miss it.

Midlake_DVD_Denton72DPI

The National Up Front

P1000846The National played at the Greek Theater in Berkeley last month supporting their May 2013 release Trouble Will Find Me almost a year after it’s release.  The band were in fine form, driving their slow burning moody compositions to lovely crescendos – punctuating dark passages with horns and carefully placed guitars and keys to enliven the procession.  This American indie band consists of Matt Berninger (lead vocals), twins Aaron and Bryce Dessner (guitars, keys, vocals) and brothers Bryan and Scott Devendork (bass and drums respectively).  I’ve heard their music compared to the likes of Joy Division though their overall sound is completely current, and a bit hard to nail down – lots of downbeat tracks, though so many of them building to a triumphant impression. Matt is a baritone and as such inhabits the sound spectrum at the low end, spilling out his unique lyrics, huddling over his mic, or stalking the stage to accentuate the sound of their work.  This time out, the band backed the volume down during key passages, allowing Matt to be heard clearly and gain additional dynamics in the mix – a clever way to help connect him and the band to the audience.  The show was a wonderful demonstration of their wares – the best yet for this viewer.

P1000851Tracks selected weighed heavily on their most current release, along with a handful from High Violet (2010), and a small selection from both Boxer (2007) and Alligator (2005).  Near the end of the main set, they included a nice rendition of the track “About Today” from the Cherry Tree EP (2004).

Of special note this time out was their lighting and backdrops which alternated between evocative psychedelic projections, and slightly obscured video of band members as they performed.  These visuals reflected the mystique of their music and added interest to the live experience.

P1000870In these pages I most often write about “progressive rock” and similar sounds that tend towards the more esoteric side of the musical spectrum.  The National, though firmly in the “indie” or “alternative rock” genre, still inhabit a part of that adventurous territory where thoughtful lyrics, creative compositions, blends of acoustic and electric instruments and strange-but-beautiful music that builds on dark themes live. THis is one of a few bands where a brooding baritone can inspire an entire crowd to sing along joyfully to a mournful song.  A highly recommended experience.

 

Appendix: Complete Set List:

Don’t Swallow the Cap (Trouble Will Find Me)
I Should Live in Salt (Trouble Will Find Me)
Bloodbuzz Ohio (High Violet)
Demons (Trouble Will Find Me)
Sea of Love (Trouble Will Find Me)
Hard to Find (Trouble Will Find Me)
Afraid of Everyone (High Violet)
Squalor Victoria (Boxer)
I Need My Girl (Trouble Will Find Me)
This is the Last Time (Trouble Will Find Me)
Santa Clara (Boxer)
All the Wine (Alligator)
Abel (Alligator)
Slow Show (Boxer)
Pink Rabbits (Trouble Will Find Me)
England (High Violet)
Graceless (Trouble Will Find Me)
About Today (Cherry Tree)
Fake Empire (Boxer)

Encore:
Ada (Boxer)
Mr. November (Alligator)
Terrible Love (High Violet)
Vanderlyle Crybaby Geeks (acoustic) (High Violet)

I saw more than a few tears during this final encore – also the last track on High Violet.  The band all came up to the front of the stage and played this soulful ditty in an acoustic, heartfelt rendition – a perfect ending to a beautiful night.