Tag Archives: led zeppelin

Rockin’ Angels Interview

Jon Downes, editor of Gonzo Weekly interviewed me last week about my new book, Rockin’ the City of Angels. Here is the transcript, also up at GonzoWeekly.com:

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Tell us about the book

When I was a teenager (way back in the 1970s), I was lucky enough to be able to attend dozens of rock concerts staged in Los Angeles, (aka the City of Angels). Rock music was life to me, and probably due to 7 years of piano lessons I was in love with prog rock. My collection of records and concert tickets included Genesis, Yes, Jethro Tull, and Pink Floyd, along with what I felt were the highest quality rock bands like Zep, The Who, Queen, and Kansas. Music patronage became a lifelong passion for me. The concerts at that time were becoming amazing spectacles, with elaborate theatrical productions. As the lyrics were often as important as the music to me, the fact that many bands dramatized the themes of certain songs, or even whole concept albums made for artful theater.

I wrote this book as a “love letter” to rock musicians of the ‘70s— focused ultimately on the concerts and the films that captured them. I used only photos of the bands live in concert – no portraits. I wanted to show and tell the story of these concert performances from the standpoint of a fan, hoping a reader would relate to a guy who might have been a few seats down the row at these shows, who might have raved about what we just saw on the way home.

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As an example of a chapter, one covers the Genesis tour The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway. There are fantastic shots by Armando Gallo, a Melody-Maker cover showing Gabriel’s grotesque Slipperman costume, pages from the concert program, a ticket stub from the date at the Los Angeles Shrine auditorium, and sample frames from the film. The written material illuminates the album and tour, the special effects, and the film of the production’s slide show, which many fans might not realize exists (it’s on the 71-75 box set). This was a blueprint for all 36 bands covered.

How long has it taken to research and write?

At one level its taken 45 years of “field research,” record collecting, and study. But from the time I started writing and finding the photos it all took 2.5 years. I spent a lot of this time tracking down a selection of iconic photographs from around the world, sometimes digging through archives at agencies, others directly with the photographers of that day. I was fortunate to meet several of those photojournalists including Neal Preston, Armando Gallo, Neil Zlozower, and Lisa Tanner, who opened their archives for me at their studios or homes. I could not believe how many amazing shots exist that have never been seen by fans, shots that captured our musical heroes in their prime.

mccartneypaulwings_rockshowcover_72dpiAnother thing that took a lot of time was combing through more than 100 rock films from the decade, all part of my private collection. You and I know that TV appearances, professionally filmed 35mm movies—even celluloid left in the can for years, sometimes decades after light hit the film—are finally getting home video or streaming media release. I remember going to see many of these films at the local cinema that featured Led Zeppelin, Yes, AC/DC, Alice Cooper, Paul McCartney and Wings, and so many others. Now, just about every major band of the rock world can be seen performing live in one format or another, thanks to Eagle Rock Entertainment, Warner Home Video, and others who are helping to keep their legacies alive. I’m still that guy, the one who collects the high quality digital transfers available on media, rather than streaming them. Having said that, many of these films are available on streaming services like YouTube.

Were there any gigs you didn’t go to which you wished you had seen?

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Oh yeah! For each band I had to select what I think in retrospect was their finest hour –the best album and concert, and the best film covering that band, hopefully for that same tour. In the case for instance of Jethro Tull, I had not seen the Passion Play tour, but I knew through older friends and research that it would have been for me their best, and that is my favorite Tull record after all. Same with Genesis’ Lamb tour, though tribute band The Musical Box recreated it professionally just recently.

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In a few examples, I did not get to see the band in the ‘70s but instead did catch them later. Only three bands out of 36 eluded me completely. I was never inclined to see AC/DC (although I did enjoy the great film, Let There Be Rock!), and Happy The Man never toured the west coast (and, there is no film!). The worst mistake was missing the mighty Led Zeppelin. In the case of the Zep ‘77 tour, I loved Presence, and that was the concert to see, but I was instead booked to see Pink Floyd’s Animals concert just weeks before and budgets kept me from seeing more than one show every couple months.

What was the best gig you ever saw?

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All of that is in the Genesis family – I will never forget the Wind & Wuthering tour in 1977, and the first time I saw Peter Gabriel solo at the Roxy Theater the next year. But number one was Gabriel’s tour for his 4th album (also dubbed Security) which came early in the ‘80s – it’s a bit of a cheat as I cover that show in this “70s” book, but it’s really for me, the epilogue of the ‘70s decade. He absolutely stunned the audience and finally emerged on his own at the level of performance he had achieved while in his former band. Armando Gallo’s unbelievable shots give a very good idea of the drama. As there is literally no film of this seminal tour, we examine the So movie, particularly those songs he performed in the same way as that prior tour (like “Lay Your Hands On Me”).

Others in the top tier include Paul McCartney’s Wings Over America tour, Queen’s News of the World tour during which Freddie held the audience in complete awe, Kansas Point on Know Return featuring Steve Walsh giving the most physical performance I’ve ever seen, Dixie Dregs with their stunning virtuosity, Camel, ELO – so many incredible shows I will never forget. For the Floyd, while Animals was spectacular, I suffered a bit of “bad vibe” that night in the gi-hugic Anaheim Stadium, and it was eventually to be Roger Water’s restaging of the Wall this decade that became the ultimate live experience of that band’s music for me.

How did you go about the picture research?

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This was the most difficult part of the book’s production, hands down. Thank God for Google, but even with all the search engines in the world, it was amazingly difficult to find some of the photographers and shots that eventually did appear in the book. One snap alone, of Camel in concert with the London Symphony Orchestra on the night they recorded The Snow Goose together, took 7 months to find and it was sitting in the vaults at The Daily Mail, having also been recently unearthed by a researcher at PROG magazine (RIP). I never found shots of Ambrosia and Happy The Man until I actually reached a member from the band themselves, who had boxes “in the attic” with old shots and memorabilia. A lot of the shots in the book came from slides I was allowed to borrow and scan at Dickermans in San Francisco.

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Ambrosia’s David Pack, Joe Puerta

What is your next project?

TalkingHeads_SMSPoster_72dpiWell, this book was so expensive to produce that I have to sell all the copies I ordered during this year. Provided that happens, I will move to the next decade, sliding into the ‘80s with late ‘70s punk, then covering the era of New Wave music, including bands like Depeche Mode, The Cocteau Twins, Japan, Echo & The Bunnymen and so many others that were part of the second “British invasion!” I’m really looking forward to that as I’ve not seen any great ‘80s genre books that include what for me were the best bands of that decade with any kind of stunning photography.

Thank you to Jon Downes and his long time support of my work at GonzoWeekly.com

Hey ma, I got the cover!

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Rockin’ the City of Angels – How?

Click here to buy Rockin’ the City of Angels, the new book now available at Amazon.com

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This is the third in a three-part piece about my new book Rockin’ the City of Angels, and I want to answer the question – how did all this come about, for a guy that worked in the tech industry for so many years, and became a writer so late in life?

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Doug & Steve Hackett

In earlier posts, I established that I am a die-hard fan of classic and progressive rock from the 1970s and beyond. I saw almost every one of the 36 artists in the book in Los Angeles (the City of Angels) in the 1970s. But my first written piece on a rock concert was inspired by seeing Rick Wakeman live in London in 2009 with orchestra, choir, and Brian Blessed telling the stories of the six wives of Henry the VIIIth:
https://diegospadeproductions.com/2009/05/16/six-wives-live-live/

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Doug more recently in 2016 with Rick Wakeman and band

From this meager beginning my friend Jeff Melton, a writer for Expose magazine, helped me get the article accepted and into print. On that basis, I contacted several zines, determined to write about these concerts as they came along, and maybe about new and legacy record releases. Jonathan Downes at Gonzo Multimedia liked what he saw and picked me up as staff writer for his magazine: http://www.gonzoweekly.com

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Doug’s Review of Phil Collins’ Bio

After years writing for Gonzo, and also contributing to SomethingElse! I put a pause on my tech career and started the process of writing the book that is about to be shipped. It was a long two year process of incorporating to become a self publisher, locating photos, completing the manuscript, getting editors (Mike Edison, Courtney Lee Adams), a musicologist (Tim Smolko), and a designer (Tilman Reitzle) and others to take the journey with me.

One of the best aspects of the effort was the nearly two years I spent looking for photographs and memorabilia to illuminate the manuscript. I searched through thousands of slides in the basement of a photo agency in London, housed in the same building that was a workhouse, which inspired Charles Dickens’ portrayal of David Copperfield. I trolled websites figuring out how to find photographers from the day, Neal Preston, Richard E. Aaron, Neil Zlowzower, Lisa Tanner, some purely by accident, some who had photos already placed inside album sleeves and music magazines, others carried by agencies like Getty and Rex Features.

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Neal Preston

I will never forget the 2 hours Neal Preston spent with me on the phone talking about his experiences in the day following Led Zeppelin, The Who, and so many classic bands around the country as part of their posse and at times with best friend Cameron Crowe. He had never met me, but nonetheless was generous and enthusiastic on the phone. Also, I was lucky to find and connect with Italian photojournalist Armando Gallo, someone whose work I revere back to the days when his shots

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Armando Gallo

were the only way to see what Peter Gabriel-era Genesis was all about. I never expected the chance to visit both of these artists at their home studios, working together to pick out slides for this book, so many of which are theirs. 

Working with the fine purveyors of rare rock photography at the San Francisco Art Exchange, I was able to connect with many photographers, and one of their special clients Roger Dean, the artist who painted so many Yes album covers among many other achievements. Through this connection, it came to pass that Roger invited my wife and I over to his studios in Essex England while we were in London on vacation. Visiting this studio and meeting Roger and his brother Martyn (who worked with me to select his shots of Yes on tour in 1976) is now a cherished memory.

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Doug with Roger Dean

To top that off, I was able to work directly with musical heroes of mine from Ambrosia and Happy The Man to unearth ’70s photographs from their private collections. This we did, and I was also able to interview band members and document their fantastic stories. For Ambrosia, we focused on their classic Somewhere I Never Travelled, https://diegospadeproductions.com/2016/01/28/ambrosias-early-travels/

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and for Happy the Man, their famous Arista releases, the self titled debut, and the followup Crafty Hands https://diegospadeproductions.com/2016/04/02/happy-the-man/

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Another somewhat tougher climb, the five-month, seven-person introduction effort it took to find one photo of Camel in concert on the night they recorded The Snow Goose live with the London Symphony Orchestra. Oh, elusive photo….

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I could go on, but should stop here. It’s been a terrific ride, and here’s hoping that everyone who comes across this book sees the devotion that went into it, and loves what they see and read… Doug

Rockin’ the City of Angels: What?

Click here to buy Rockin’ the City of Angels, the new book now available at Amazon.com

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Titled Rockin’ the City of Angels, the book was a 2 year labor of love for this long time rock fanatic. I described it on the back cover in this way:

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STROBE FLASHES PIERCE THE DARK STAGE to reveal a NYC street punk as he faces the other half of his fractured self. A father’s WWII fighter plane crashes into a wall, temporarily slowing its ascent around his son’s troubled heart. A fiend clad in a white tuxedo steps out from the frame of a graveyard scene onto a haunted stage welcoming all to his many nightmares. A woman, weapon drawn, tells the story of James and his very cold gun. The top drummer from the top 70s rock band in the world pounds out the opening beat that tells us it’s been a long time since he rock ‘n’ rolled . . . a long lonely, lonely, lonely, lonely lonely time.

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David Bowie photo (c) Neil Zlowzower / Atlas Icons

THESE IMAGES ARE SEARED into my memory from the rock concerts I witnessed in Los Angeles, the “City of Angels” in the 1970s, a time when rock bands were making expansive concept records with sweeping themes. Rock albums at the time promised “theater of the mind,” and their creators were inspired to mount elaborate stage shows that brought these dreams to life. These artists used every available piece of stagecraft—lights, projections, backdrops, props, and costumes—to create awesome spectacles for arenas packed with adoring fans— fans like you and me.

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This book celebrates more than thirty of these incredible performances including key tours by bands such as Led Zeppelin, Queen, David Bowie, Fleetwood Mac, Genesis, Heart, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, The Who and Yes. We’ll share memories of those legendary concerts and my reviews of the best video documents of the era, each band illuminated by a hand-picked collection of brilliant images—some never-before seen—by the best photo- journalists of that time including Richard E. Aaron, Jorgen Angel, Fin Costello, Armando Gallo, Neal Preston, Jim Summaria, Lisa Tanner and Neil Zlowzower along with many others.

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Who photo (c) Neal Preston

This coffee-table book is nearly the size of an LP album cover, 396 pages, over 500 images, written by Douglas Harr, designed by Tilman Reitzle. Forword by Armando Gallo.

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The bands, order by category, then the date of their key performance in L.A.

Bad Company Lives Live!

badcompanylive_cover_72dpiBad Company is one of the most important rock bands of the 1970s. They topped a hard rock core with silky smooth yet gritty production values, hooks galore, and pedigree in each musician. They are a band I had to, regrettably leave out of my upcoming book Rockin’ the City of Angels. The omission is due in large part to a few issues – most importantly that the book is a celebration of the outstanding concerts of the ‘70s including classic rock and prog bands, and I did not get to see them in concert until recently. I could not find any footage nor official live albums of the band during that decade. That last excuse has just been remedied with the release of an outstanding double-CD set of Bad Company Live in concert 1977 and 1979.

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The release is exceptional in every important way. The first set, recorded in 1977 at The Summit, Houston Texas, May 23, 1977 captures the band tearing through 15 tracks over 76 minutes, starting off with the title track from that year’s album Burnin’ Sky (1977) and ending with the mega-hit “Feel Like Makin’ Love.” Label mates Led Zeppelin played the same venue just two days earlier, and this show similarly brims with crackling intensity. The second set is just two minutes longer with the same number tracks, taken from the Empire Pool, Wembley Arena in London March 9, 1979, where they did three shows to 12,000 fans each night, just a week before the release of Desolation Angels (1979) considered by most to be their last strong album. The set list begins with the title track of their debut, Bad Company (1974), and ends with another hit “Can’t Get Enough.” In between quite a number of the “then new” tracks are included, most notably “Gone, Gone, Gone” and “Rock ‘N’ Roll Fantasy.” In addition a cover of the Hendrix breakout hit “Hey Joe” was taken from the Capital Center, Washington DC, also in ’79.

Overall, the sets are edited so that there are only two tunes repeated between the 1977 to 1979 shows – just “Shooting Star” and “Feel Like Makin’ Love” appear on both discs, smartly leaving buyers with a generous helping of 28 songs performed live. Most importantly, these sets sound fantastic. There are no overdubs made to either show, a fact noted on the promo sticker. Fans of the band know how unnecessary sonic tinkering would have been, as the original four-piece Bad Company lineup was known as a non-nonsense powerhouse in concert. My book designer Tilman Reitzle saw the show in ’79 and told me the band was the most rehearsed, professional group he had ever seen, able to be precise while still keeping the energy and excitement at the highest level. Between-song chatter was kept to a minimum, and you can now hear the remarkable economy and precision of their delivery on this set. It comes from the rock-steady beat of drummer Simon Kirke (ex-Free), to the baddest fretless bass from Boz Burrell (coming off a stint with King Crimson), amped guitar riffs from Mick Ralphs (ex-Mott The Hoople), and pitch perfect vocals from Paul Rogers (also ex-Free), certainly one of the genre’s most talented, dependable vocalists, not to mention his capable chops on piano and guitar, which helped to round out the band’s sound.

The booklet, authored by David Clayton is informative, if a bit shy on photos of the guys on stage and off. Having said that, the shots that are included, by Brannon Tommey, Bruce Kessler, Alan Perry, and Aubrey Powell are fantastic. There are also snaps of memorabilia – mostly ads for the shows, tickets and backstage passes. The booklet includes a background with lots of information about their progress in studio and the extensive, sometimes punishing touring schedule. Clayton puzzles as to how these tapes remained untouched in the vault for 40 years, something we can all agree on. He also provides this, a favorite quote about the band: “guys wanted to be them and girls wanted to be with them.”

It’s said that manager Peter Grant’s belief that live audio and film recordings took away from the impetus to see his bands live contributed to the unavailability of these artifacts from Bad Company. Grant also managed Led Zeppelin who released limited and rather poor live audio and filmed material during the decade, something that has also been rectified in years since. Fans can now rejoice that at least on the audio front this has been corrected with this superb new CD release. Add it to your collection, and hang on for video that hopefully one day will follow…

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Paul Rogers, still rockin’ today

p.s.

Best videos I’ve located from the 1970s are almost exclusively from television appearances:

Feel Like Makin’ Love:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeZqjZ_kvLY

Can’t Get Enough:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7p9mzYB–uI

 

 

Led Zeppelin’s Presence

Led Zeppelin_DVD_Shot_72dpiLed Zeppelin, the mightiest rock band of the 1970’s, has been on my mind quite a bit lately. For one thing, guitarist Jimmy Page just recently finished the mammoth task of remastering and re-releasing deluxe versions of every Led Zeppelin album, each with an extra disc of demos and outtakes from the studio sessions. While it would have been nice to have that second disc full of live material from each album’s associated tour, the packages have been stellar with improved sound, informative essays, and captivating photos by band photographer Neal Preston and others. Some of the demos and alternate takes are of interest – two come immediately to mind, a gorgeous version of “The Rain Song” from Houses of the Holy and an unbelievably aggressive barnstorming early take on “Trampled Under Foot” from Physical Graffiti called “Brandy and Coke.”

Led Zeppelin_PresenceCover_72dpiThe last one of these remasters I purchased was the epic Zeppelin album, Presence, originally released way back in 1976. The record is packed with arguably the best guitar riffs and leads of Page’s long career. It starts with the loose but driven opener “Achilles Last Stand,” a long piece that sounds spontaneous and free, played with the abandon of a train that’s about to come off the tracks, fueled by some of drummer John Bonham’s most amazing fills on record. The highlight for this patron was the scorching, progressive rocker “For Your Life” during which Page makes impressive use of his Stratocaster’s tremolo arm, and Robert Plant’s vocals match ascending chord structures with a power that sounds as if he is, in fact, fighting for his own life. The rest of the album is similarly impressive, a lesson in rock perfection from each of the four artists, Page/Plant/Jones/Bonham. This is the album and tour I will be covering in my book next year.

Led Zeppelin_OGWTWhile researching the book project, I’ve been reflecting on the concert films of the 1970’s, some of which will be explored in the text. There weren’t many proper concert films released to theaters back in that decade, in fact besides getting to the concerts themselves, there were more chances at that time to see our favorite bands on television specials, such as Don Krishner’s Rock Concert and The Midnight Special in the states, The Old Grey Whistle Test and Top of the Pops in the U.K., and Musikladen in Germany. The only concert films I recall hitting the cinemas were as follows: Yessongs for Yes, Trick of the Tail/White Rock for Genesis/Wakeman, Welcome to my Nightmare for Alice Cooper, and The Song Remains the Same for Zeppelin. There were more, what do you recall?

I saw The Song Remains the Same at my local theater upon it’s release, and frankly was, and have remained, a bit let down by the movie. Professionally filmed at the famous Madison Square Gardens in 1973, the picture is crisp and colorful. It’s the performance that I feel lacks something, not a monumental miss, just not what I believe were some of their best nights, despite being a milestone moment for the band. For years, I regretted not being able to catch Zep live in Los Angeles before Bonham’s untimely passing, and pined for a better chance to see what rabid fans proclaimed were the most incredible live performances of the era.

Led Zeppelin_DVD_Cover_72dpiFinally in 2003 all debate as to the power and majesty of the mighty Zeppelin in concert were put to rest, with the release of their self-titled Led Zeppelin DVD. It’s a stunning treasure chest containing more than 5 hours of interviews, televised clips and 35mm films capturing the band live throughout their career. First up, there are rare black and white clips of the group as they debuted on Danish television, along with two additional early performances. Viewers are then treated to a pristine footage from the tour supporting Led Zeppelin II in 1970 at the Royal Albert Hall in London, shot using two 16mm cameras. The next disc begins with a pastiche of bootleg videos for “The Immigrant Song,” followed by additional footage of the 1973 Madison Square Garden concert, clips that are also now available on the expanded DVD version of The Song Remains the Same. A favorite from this added footage is “Misty Mountain Hop,” one of Zep’s most buoyant songs, often played consummately by the longtime Zep fans Heart in years since.

The real gem of this set is footage of the band at Earls Court in London supporting Physical Graffiti in 1975, including a rare look at the group’s acoustic set featuring “That’s The Way” from the third album. Best yet is what must be their most spectacular moment, a perfect, emotionally draining rendition of the bluesy lament “In My Time of Dying” followed by a cranked-up, frenetic version of “Trampled Under Foot” featuring Jones’ funky clavichord riffs. Between these two Physical Graffiti classics, we are able to witness first-rate performances from each band member. As if all this wasn’t enough, the collection ends with seven tracks from an intense outdoor performance at Knebworth in 1979, their last before Bonham’s death and the group’s subsequent split. That night, the band played the two tracks they had been doing from Presence after it’s release, “Achilles Last Stand,” and “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” along with their undisputed Physical Graffiti classic “Kashmir.” Instead of finding the band on the decline, this stands as absolute evidence of their continued relevance.

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While bootleg audio and video of Led Zeppelin performing live abound, including notably some of these performances in their entirety, I prefer to support artists by collecting official releases on media, and in this case, there were painstaking efforts to clean up previously unseen footage by Page and team. Until additional film is released, this two-disc collection is the best footage available of this seminal band, and comes highly recommended.

Led Zeppelin DVD Track-list:

Disc 1

Communication Breakdown / Dazed and Confused / We’re Gonna Groove / I Can’t Quit You Baby / Dazed And Confused / White Summer / What Is And What Should Never Be / How Many More Times / Moby Dick / Whole Lotta Love / Communication Breakdown / C’mon Everybody / Something Else / Bring It On Home

Disc 2

Immigrant Song / Black Dog / Misty Mountain Hop / Since I’ve Been Loving You / The Ocean / Going To California / That’s The Way / Bron-Y-Aur Stomp / In My Time Of Dying / Trampled Underfoot / Stairway To Heaven / Rock And Roll / Nobody’s Fault But Mine / Sick Again / Achilles Last Stand / In The Evening / Kashmir / Whole Lotta Love

Robert Plant Bottles Rock

Plant1_72DPIRobert Plant totally rocked the BottleRock festival in Napa California on May 30, 2015. We brought a dozen friends along for our birthday weekend, and went in with mixed expectations – knowing he would do some of his own material and of course some Led Zeppelin classics and generally just hoping to see this rock n’ roll legend perform at his best.

Plant_BR_72DPIFrom the start we were actually a bit shocked at how incredible the show was. Robert opened with “The Wanton Song” an old Zeppelin classic, performed pretty much as originally recorded. What followed was a mix of his solo work, covers, and Zeppelin songs, including “Black Dog”, “The Lemon Song”, “What Is and What Should Never Be” and others. During Robert’s rendition of “Going To California” a 20 something woman behind me started to cry and I realized what an impact Zeppelin’s music and Robert’s vocal prowess have meant to generations.

Plant_lullaby_coverBut much of what we appreciated was actually Robert’s new work. He and band messed with the structure of those old Zep tunes, interspersing them with similarly dark and dramatic songs from his new album lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar, an aptly named record that explores America’s roots music. They performed “Turn It Up”, “Rainbow” and “Little Maggie” (check out Little Maggie here) from that new album and proceeded to flavor covers and old songs alike with the same type of instrumentation and song structure; a mix of delta blues, Appalachian folk and other forms which often meandered about and around verse and chorus via virtuosic instrumentals. To further underline his inspirations, Robert covered Willie Dixon, Howlin’ Wolf, Bukka White, Muddy Waters and other American blues masters. Robert spoke glowingly about these artists and his quest to explore their music, adding to the sense of historical occasion. It all made for a thoroughly enjoyable brew of rock-‘n-roots that wove a path between atmospheric dark and light tones.

Plant3_72DPIThe musicianship was first rate (his excellent band is dubbed “The Sensational Space Shifters”) and Robert’s voice was warm and pliant, as he has most definitely worked out how to preserve his given instrument – hitting some of the high notes required to replicate bits of his early 20’s Zep work while still having the mid range, growl and soft tones for his new work and covers. I listened trying to imagine him doing more Zeppelin reunion shows and couldn’t see it – as much as old fans might fawn, at this stage of life it would seem a shame to see Robert locked into a Zeppelin hits tour, during which he would be expected to sound as much like the old records as possible. We will spin our 2007 Celebration DVD instead – my guess is it’s not going to happen again. Instead Robert was able to bend and weave through selected tunes in a confident, skilled voice, changing key and pitch to suit. With so many classic rock vocalists unable to perform later in life in any compelling way, it was an absolute joy to hear Robert sounding so good and looking truly happy – that made the show everything we hoped it could be and more.

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